Gentoo Forums
Gentoo Forums
Gentoo Forums
Quick Search: in
openrc update has broken my networking
View unanswered posts
View posts from last 24 hours

 
Reply to topic    Gentoo Forums Forum Index Portage & Programming
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
sasq
Apprentice
Apprentice


Joined: 09 Sep 2005
Posts: 221
Location: Poland

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 12:35 am    Post subject: openrc update has broken my networking Reply with quote

Recenty I was updating my system, and one of the required updates was openrc.
The emerge finished with a red error message:

Code:
netifrc-0.2.2:

This package will overwrite one or more files that may belong to other packages (see list below).
You can use a command [..]

Detected file collision(s):
   /lib/udev/net.sh
   /lib/udev/rules.d/90-network.rules

Searching all installed packages for file collisions...
Press Ctrl+C to Stop

  sys-fs/udev-171-r6:0::gentoo

Package net-misc/netifrc-0.2.2 NOT merged due to file collisions.


I thought to myself: "OK, so if this is gonna overwrite some important files in my current system, it is good to NOT merge it." and I forgot about it.
But after rebooting there was a big surprise waiting for me:
No network connection, no network devices in /dev, and no init scripts to bring them up! :o
So I cannot even emerge anything which could fix my problem now! :s

Nice move, Gentoo devs..... -_-
Now please take me out of this trouble.

I guess that it is the netifrc which contains these init scripts which are missing (since this is the only package which hasn't been installed), but I cannot install it until it complains about overwriting these files, which seem to belong to udev somehow.

I tried updating udev, hoping that it will move these conflicting files somewhere else (should't the openrc update account for that automatically?). But the udev update seems to pull a lot of other packages for update, such as XFCE, MESA, X.org etc., and I don't know why. Isn't udev supposed to be low-level stuff for managing devices in /dev? Why does it even touch the high-level packages? Is there any way to just update udev first without bringing in half of my system into update, until I fix up the networking? (Because without networking it would be VERY HARD to update all that stuff ;/ ).
_________________
SasQ
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hu
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 06 Mar 2007
Posts: 14572

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 1:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

=sys-fs/udev-171-r6 was removed from the tree more than a year ago. If you still have it installed, then either you are badly out of date or you have been doing very selective upgrades. No one tests mixing very old packages with very new packages, so breakage is not surprising when you try it.

If you need support, please post the output of emerge --info, the exact error message(s) that you need solved, and the command(s) you ran to receive those error messages.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tony0945
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 25 Jul 2006
Posts: 3389
Location: Illinois, USA

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 1:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You will get even more trouble if you update to the latest udev. Try to install eudev instead. You might need virtual/udev also, but you might have it already or it might be installed along with eudev.

run 'eselect news list' and read all the old news postings about udev & eudev, although they are kind of murky.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sasq
Apprentice
Apprentice


Joined: 09 Sep 2005
Posts: 221
Location: Poland

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 2:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hu wrote:
=sys-fs/udev-171-r6 was removed from the tree more than a year ago. If you still have it installed, then either you are badly out of date or you have been doing very selective upgrades.

Yes, I've been doing very selective updates, because it is an old laptop with broken cooling system, so I try to avoid long compilation cycles because the CPU is heating up very badly during that and it resets the machine when it gets overheated. And this also means back to square one with the compilation. Also, portage has got very slow with time on that machine (and I mean VERY slow: every emerge query grinds the HDD by several minutes! Is it normal at all?). So updating this system could be really hard. Life is not always as easy as you may think...

Hu wrote:
No one tests mixing very old packages with very new packages

Yeah, it's better to let the users make their systems broken ;. <sarcasm off>

Hu wrote:
so breakage is not surprising when you try it.

Well, but it is surprising that when I want to do exactly that: update my old outdated system, so that it won't be outdated anymore, I got punished.

Hu wrote:
If you need support, please post the output of emerge --info

This could be hard, since (as I've already said) my system is broken and with no networking I'd need hand-writing every piece of text I am required to post here, or carrying it back and forth on a pendrive. And emerge --info is quite a lot of output! Most of it irrelevant. So it would be better if you tell me what exact information do you need from it, and I'll copy just that.

Hu wrote:
the exact error message(s) that you need solved

Wasn't it clear enough in my OP? I was updating openrc (OBVIOUSLY by calling emerge openrc), got the red error message I hand-copied above, omitting only the irrelevant part of it as "[...]", leaving the relevan part, that is: what exact files are conflicting and what packages they belong to, and this is the very same error message I get when I try emerging netifrc alone. Since it seems to conflict with the outdated udev, I'm trying to fix that by updating the udev first (OBVIOUSLY emerge -pvt udev), but it brings a shitload of packages as a dependency (don't know why), many of them impossible to install due to blocks (not counting the lack of network connection).

Hu wrote:
and the command(s) you ran to receive those error messages.

Just simple and OBVIOUS emerge packageName calls. Am I really required to dumb out every the single obvious command here? ;.

OK, so to focus back on topic:

It seems to me that I need to somehow fix the colliding files of netifrc and the outdated version of udev, and I suppose that updating udev could solve the problem. So just tell me this:

Is there any way to update just udev, without pulling in all those dependencies, at least until I get the network working again?
Then I can try updating the remaining part of the system.

Edit:
Tony0945 wrote:
You will get even more trouble if you update to the latest udev. Try to install eudev instead.

Thanks very much for the warning. It could save me some additional headache I guess. I'll try eudev, as you've suggested.
BTW what's the difference between these two? And why the new udev can be worse than the old one? If this is the case, why am I required to update to something worse? Those are really mixed signals to me... To update or not to update, that is the question... :P

BTW would it be a bad idea to unmerge the old udev altogether and then try emerging netifrc before installing the newer versions of udev or eudev? I don't want to break it more still, but it seems that the old udev is the stumbling block here.
_________________
SasQ
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kurly
Apprentice
Apprentice


Joined: 02 Apr 2012
Posts: 255

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 2:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You do realize Hu is under no obligation to attempt to help you, right? You may not like what he has to say, but he's been here long enough to know what he's talking about, and you could at least pretend to be appreciative. I am 100% certain that he is not responsible for the current state of your system. The fact of the matter is that your machine is over a year out of date, and upgrading it is going to be painful. This is not punishment from the developers; this is a case of a negligent administrator (or maybe you have a valid reason, not my place to judge).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sasq
Apprentice
Apprentice


Joined: 09 Sep 2005
Posts: 221
Location: Poland

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 2:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kurly wrote:
You do realize Hu is under no obligation to attempt to help you, right?

Of course I do realize. But in that case he's also in no obligation to reply, since a condescending tone and telling me what I already know is of no value to me in my situation. We can discuss how much I am outdated and how a negligent administrator I am in some more comfty circumstances.

kurly wrote:
You may not like what he has to say, but he's been here long enough to know what he's talking about, and you could at least pretend to be appreciative.

I'm not here to pretend anything nor to pray to long-registered users (I'v been here for a while too).
I'm here to solve my problem.

kurly wrote:
I am 100% certain that he is not responsible for the current state of your system.

And I'm not saying he is.

kurly wrote:
The fact of the matter is that your machine is over a year out of date

Tell me something I don't know...

kurly wrote:
or maybe you have a valid reason

Trust me, if I hadn't had my reasons, I'd have updated this stuff lot more often. But I couldn't. See my previous post.

kurly wrote:
not my place to judge

But you did it anyway...

So just to clear things out and get back to the subject:
I'm not demanding help, but I'm asking for it.
I don't require anyone to answer me, so if you (or anyone else) don't like to help me or cannot, or you just have a burning urge to tell me how much outdated I am (which I'm very well aware of), please go somewhere else.
_________________
SasQ
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hu
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 06 Mar 2007
Posts: 14572

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 3:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

sasq wrote:
Also, portage has got very slow with time on that machine (and I mean VERY slow: every emerge query grinds the HDD by several minutes! Is it normal at all?).
A full query with nothing cached is slow, especially if you store the Portage tree on a filesystem that is not well suited to having thousands of small files. Using a laptop drive makes it even worse, though even spinning desktop drives can feel slow in this case.
sasq wrote:
Hu wrote:
No one tests mixing very old packages with very new packages

Yeah, it's better to let the users make their systems broken ;. <sarcasm off>
Hu wrote:
so breakage is not surprising when you try it.

Well, but it is surprising that when I want to do exactly that: update my old outdated system, so that it won't be outdated anymore, I got punished.
If you updated in a timely manner, you would be getting the same updates that everyone else is already testing. You waited too long, so now you are on a path no one else tried. It might work. It might not. I see varying advice about how far out of date you can get before things become difficult, but even the most generous estimates say waiting more than a year leads you into trouble.

The developers include tests to prevent catastrophic breakage, but they cannot catch everything.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
The Doctor
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 27 Jul 2010
Posts: 2600

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 3:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Tell me something I don't know...
You choose to install a distro that uses a rolling update scheme and decided not to roll with them. You get to keep the pieces.
Quote:
I don't require anyone to answer me, so if you (or anyone else) don't like to help me or cannot, or you just have a burning urge to tell me how much outdated I am (which I'm very well aware of), please go somewhere else.
Apparently you don't quite grasp your problem. Partial updates of the type your using just won't work and abusing everyone who points this out won't change this.
_________________
First things first, but not necessarily in that order.

Apologies if I take a while to respond. I'm currently working on the dematerialization circuit for my blue box.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jaglover
Watchman
Watchman


Joined: 29 May 2005
Posts: 7339
Location: Saint Amant, Acadiana

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 3:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gentoo is a rolling Linux, you either keep it up to date and enjoy all the benefits that come with it or you drop behind and suffer.
I have an IBM T23 running Gentoo, I upgrade it once a month using pump distcc.
Hu replied to help you asking for additional information.
Did you provide it?
_________________
Please learn how to denote units correctly!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sasq
Apprentice
Apprentice


Joined: 09 Sep 2005
Posts: 221
Location: Poland

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 3:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, maybe we should start a separate topic where you guys could continue hanging dogs on me instead of actually helping?
Seems to me that there are lot of people who want to tell me how much outdated I am and how bad is it.
What a nice way out when you don't know what to say... ;.

Jaglover wrote:
I have an IBM T23 running Gentoo, I upgrade it once a month using pump distcc.

Good for you then. But as I've alreasy said, life is not always that easy.

Jaglover wrote:
Gentoo is a rolling Linux, you either keep it up to date and enjoy all the benefits that come with it or you drop behind and suffer.

I have several other machines which I keep up to date, because I can.
I also have this old laptop which I cannot keep up to date, since it overheats during long compilations. So I can update only in short interations, and only what really needs updating.
Telling me how much I'm outdated with it and how much it is a bad idea won't change the reality.

Jaglover wrote:
Hu replied to help you asking for additional information.

He didn't ask about anything specific. He asked about things which any noob without any clue about the problem could ask as well.
I predicted (from my own experience with similar answers) that even if I provided what he asked, it won't get us any further, if the information I provided already didn't tell him anything.

Jaglover wrote:
Did you provide it?


I provided enough information to solve this problem.
Why do I claim that?
Because I've just solved it, having only this piece of information I provided.
Thus, it was a sufficient information to anyone who actually could / wanted to help.
What's more, the hint for solution was there from the very first post.
I can post the solution, but I think that such always-up-to-date all-knowing veterans like you are, already know how to solve this problem.
(Unless you really cannot without emerge --info outputs?...)
_________________
SasQ
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
The Doctor
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 27 Jul 2010
Posts: 2600

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 4:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Wow, maybe we should start a separate topic where you guys could continue hanging dogs on me instead of actually helping?
It isn't our fault that you don't properly maintain your system. Your problem is that your system mixes software in a way that it was never intended to do. It also isn't our fault that the solution is not to do this. Abusing people who tell you this doesn't give anyone any reason to try and help.
Quote:
I have several other machines which I keep up to date, because I can.
I also have this old laptop which I cannot keep up to date, since it overheats during long compilations. So I can update only in short interations, and only what really needs updating.
Telling me how much I'm outdated with it and how much it is a bad idea won't change the reality.
And you seriously never considered using one of your computers to create a binhost for the others so you only had to build everything once and never compile anything on your laptop? And your seriously going to complain that someone points out that you can do this so?

Complaining that life isn't ideal won't change the fact that your problem is mixing outdated packages with new ones. You may have solved this problem, but there is no doubt you will run into problems again and being a jerk isn't going to make anyone want to help you.
_________________
First things first, but not necessarily in that order.

Apologies if I take a while to respond. I'm currently working on the dematerialization circuit for my blue box.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SamuliSuominen
Retired Dev
Retired Dev


Joined: 30 Sep 2005
Posts: 2133
Location: Finland

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 4:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New sys-fs/udev is a full replacement to =sys-fs/udev-171* but you need to pay attention to http://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Udev/upgrade, it's just that some people haven't followed the upgrade steps and have ran into problems and then blame it on udev, instead of themselfs

And packages sys-apps/openrc, sys-fs/udev, sys-fs/udev-init-scripts and net-misc/netifrc will all need to be upgraded in a one go (I propably missed some, but at least those)

And watch out anykind of kernel option warnings coming from sys-fs/udev emerge, if it's warning about something, it's doing so for a reason(!), like it says on the wiki page, "Warning
Be careful when upgrading udev, you will need to consider the changes listed below; ignoring them can break your system!"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ct85711
Veteran
Veteran


Joined: 27 Sep 2005
Posts: 1732

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can't forget udev changing the way they name network interfaces from the old style (which I still use and like) to a supposedly more identifying name (still seems to be a random a set of characters thrown together and called a name). I think udev changed network interface name around like the 190's or so (can't remember which version exactly), it's not that important ; but good to know ahead of time to be aware of for when the old eth0 and stuff isn't around anymore.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tony0945
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 25 Jul 2006
Posts: 3389
Location: Illinois, USA

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Checking for those files on my system.
Quote:
gentoo ~ # equery b net.sh
* Searching for net.sh ...
net-misc/netifrc-0.2.2 (/lib/udev/net.sh)
gentoo ~ # equery b 90-network.rules
* Searching for 90-network.rules ...
net-misc/netifrc-0.2.2 (/lib/udev/rules.d/90-network.rules)
gentoo ~ #

Run those queries on your system to find the colliding packages. What to do then depends on what you find. You MAY, and I stress MAY, have to add " -collision-protect -protect-owned" to FEATURES in /etc/make.conf temporarily. I think they can be added on the command line too to update netifrc.

Read the link that ssuominen gave you VERY carefully. I do recommend eudev because, as ct85711 pointed out, the ethernet names changed in later udev. Eudev retains the old rules. When your system is fully updated, read it again to decide if you want the new rules or the old, but I wouldn't throw an interface change into a major update if I could help it.

As for updating, I usually update weekly, sometimes two or three times a week as I did this week. Nevertheless, the last update updated 104 packages and I had to untangle blockers which took me hours even though the first update only updated five perl packages. It happens. Another time I updated a system several years old including changing the kernel from 2.6 or 2.4 to 3.0. That one took four days of building and rebuilding. Ultimately, I booted sysrescuecd and re-installed over it, retaining the old world file.

Sounds like your laptop needs the fan replaced or a new cooling pad. If you have a gentoo desktop as well consider using distcc for builds. But right now, lets tackle your file block, first run the equerys and we'll go from there.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hu
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 06 Mar 2007
Posts: 14572

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sasq wrote:
I also have this old laptop which I cannot keep up to date, since it overheats during long compilations. So I can update only in short interations, and only what really needs updating.
Gentoo is not a good choice for a system that cannot update itself. If you cannot repair the cooling system or use software measures to limit the excessive heating, you should either switch it to some other distribution or switch to using one of the techniques that allows it not to build everything for itself.
sasq wrote:
He didn't ask about anything specific. He asked about things which any noob without any clue about the problem could ask as well.
If you would like, next time you fail to provide basic information, I can wait for a clueless newbie to ask you those questions instead of asking them directly. That will likely delay service until such a clueless newbie happens by your thread, though.
sasq wrote:
I predicted (from my own experience with similar answers) that even if I provided what he asked, it won't get us any further, if the information I provided already didn't tell him anything.

Jaglover wrote:
Did you provide it?


I provided enough information to solve this problem.
Why do I claim that?
Because I've just solved it, having only this piece of information I provided.
Thus, it was a sufficient information to anyone who actually could / wanted to help.
What's more, the hint for solution was there from the very first post.
Before you claim to have solved the problem, perhaps you should state which problem you think you solved. As I see it, you started with at least three problems. First, you had a file collision. This is not that difficult to solve, but may or may not be tightly correlated to real problems. Second, you had a network connectivity problem. Third, you had an attitude problem. I feel confident in saying that problem #3 is not the problem you believe you solved on your own.
sasq wrote:
I can post the solution, but I think that such always-up-to-date all-knowing veterans like you are, already know how to solve this problem.
(Unless you really cannot without emerge --info outputs?...)
It is considered good etiquette to post not just that your problem has been solved, but also how it was solved. On the other hand, out-of-date systems are so often unique in their problems that your failure to provide the solution is unlikely to fail to help anyone who reads this thread months or years later.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
miket
Guru
Guru


Joined: 28 Apr 2007
Posts: 412
Location: Gainesville, FL, USA

PostPosted: Sat Jul 26, 2014 1:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's doable but you're in for some "fun". Part of the problem with being in a partially-updated state of packages is that things might not work so well together. It would be awfully hard to get the new udev into place without all the dependencies, and getting there without the network is even harder.

The answers for things (including your overheating problem) are to be found in the responses in this thread. First, as The Doctor mentioned, a thing you could try is setting up a binhost. I'll go stronger than that: the binhost is what's going to save your bacon! You might never have tried that before. I can tell you it's well worth the effort. Not only does it relieve your laptop of all that heat-producing compiling, it lets you avoid all those missing build-time dependencies you'd need to do the good updating on your laptop. Later on, you can use this same binhost to keep your system up to date.

The other nice thing about this binary-package solution is that it is a way out of the situation you're in. Boot with a live CD, chroot into the laptop, and then (after you've done the setup) you can do all the updates through the chroot.

It takes work to set everything up, but its worth the effort. Look to the guide in the wiki: http://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Binary_package_guide

So on one of your other machines with lots of memory, disk space, and CPU power, set up the server software (web, ftp, ssh) to serve the binary packages (I prefer a web server), set up a directory for the chroot and follow the Gentoo Handbook up to untarring the stage-3 tarball. Now you need to make a directory to hold the binary packages it creates. Be sure to create this within the directory tree under the chroot directory. (I use /var/lib/packages/ myself.) In the /etc/portage/make.conf, set up the compiler flags you need for the laptop and a PORTDIR="your package dir" line. Now continue to do a complete install into this chroot. Be sure also to re-emerge the system set so that you'll have a complete set of binary packages for your laptop.

Yes, this will take a good while until you get your whole world set built up to where you had it on the laptop. The thing is that you won't need to do any building on the laptop.

Now make the server software you set up on your build host point to that binary-package directory under the chroot and on the laptop add a PORTAGE_BINHOST line to pick up the packages from the binary host.

Now you can update everything and bring it up to date on the laptop. You'll have lots of fun, I'm sure, with things like network-interface renaming and kernel options that the newest udev (and sadly also eudev) want to have. The best thing is that everything will be up to date. I'd be worried about that flaky cooling, though.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ct85711
Veteran
Veteran


Joined: 27 Sep 2005
Posts: 1732

PostPosted: Sat Jul 26, 2014 10:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had to deal with the similar issue of my (old) laptop's cooling system dieing off. I didn't have an issue about updating a really out of date system, as I kept it updated. For longest time, my laptop worked fairly well, rather hot, but it worked (switched my system to XFCE to get rid of a lot of the heavy compile times). In the end the laptop worked, till I decided to shut it down (I rarely shutdown my systems) and clean the fan on it. Sadly, it gave up on me; so ended up replacing it. Overall, I have an idea an idea what caused my cooling system to start dieing off (not a good idea to have a laptop stay at 100% cpu usaged for 4+ months straight; i.e running boinc the entire time, without additional cooling supplied).

My typical system uptime for all of my computers usually run 2-3+ months; longest I've easily exceeded 9+ months. Only reason I end up restarting the computer then, is to update the kernel to a newer one (of course, all systems are kept up to date on software, with except of running kernel, which I don't update too often).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sasq
Apprentice
Apprentice


Joined: 09 Sep 2005
Posts: 221
Location: Poland

PostPosted: Sun Jul 27, 2014 5:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hu wrote:
It is considered good etiquette to post not just that your problem has been solved, but also how it was solved.

So why wasn't you so kind to post it yourself in the first place? Well, maybe it's because you didn't know it, or because you weren't so kind in the first place (that is, you didn't stand up to the standard you expect of me). What's more, there are a number of posts (two of them yours), and yet none of them provides the actual solution. So what is the real purpose of this all, if not just muddling the issue that none of you knew how to solve the problems in hand?

(With the humble exception of Tony0945, ssuominen and miket: thanks guys, your advices were kind and helpful.)

OK, so let me break this vicious circle and post my solution:

First, because of that file collision I mentioned in my OP, the netifrc package has not been installed during openrc update, blowing up networking.
I couldn't install it as long as udev-171-r6 was there on my system, because the two colliding files has belong to it. I thought that updating it to udev-215 could perhaps solve the problem if it moves the colliding files to some other place. Unfortunately, there were two problems with that:
1. I still didn't have the network connection, so I would have to carry files back and forth on a pendrive from a computer with an Internet connection.
2. This would be a pain, since udev-215 brought a whole lot of unexplained dependencies, including things like xscreensaver, audacious, konsole, subtitleeditor, ark, a whole gtk+, among other things which to me doesn't seem to be absolutely necessary to install udev o_O And I really don't know why does it pull them in as build-time dependencies.

Nevertheless, I started from bringing back the networking, so that I could then use it to emerge all I may need later.
netifrc couldn't be emerged as long as udev-171-r6 was there, so I decided for a dramatic move: temporarily unmerge udev just to be able to emerge netifrc, and then, having network back, emerge the new udev-215 or better (as Tony0945 suggested) eudev, with a minimal set of USE flags just to make it work. Kids, don't try this at home unless you know what you're doing and you remember the olden times when there was no udev.

So I unmerged udev-171-r6, and as I expected, I was able to emerge netifrc (sources of which I already had in my /usr/portage/distfiles, so no network connection was needed). But just in case if you don't have it, you can always bring your network connection up the "old way", that is:
1. Add an alias for your module in /etc/modprobe.d/aliases.conf (for example mine was: alias eth0 tg3).
2. modprobe your network card's kernel module.
3. For static IP connection, use ifconfig eth0 {your IP here} netmask {your netmask} broadcast {broadcast IP} (or use DHCP).
4. Add your default gateway (route add default gw {IP of your gateway}).
5. Add your DNS servers to /etc/resolv.conf (as nameserver {your DNS's IP here}).
After these steps, your network connection should work. If it isn't, consult Gentoo Handbook to see how to setup networking as it is done during installation.

OK, so now I have solved my first problem: after unmerging the old udev and emerging netifrc the networking scripts are back, and I can just call /etc/init.d/net.eth0 start). But I need to install udev back (new version) now.

Unfortunately, I was out of luck again: there was a power shortage, and after booting up without udev it was a disaster: most of /dev/ has been wiped out! (The power company couldn't find a better moment to switch the power off, I guess ;-P ). Fortunately I'm one of those dinosaurs who knows how device nodes in /dev has been once managed in the pre-udev times, so I could add some necessary device nodes by hand with mknod -m 600 /dev/{deviceFileName} c {majorNumber} {minorNumber}. A comprehensive list of major & minor device numbers can be found in /usr/src/linux/Documentation/devices.txt.
But yeah, it's very uncomfortable in the long run, so I really needed my udev back. So back to problem 2.

From some unexplained reasons, now emerge -pvt eudev reported less dependencies: just glib, gobject-introspection, perl (which I planned to upgrade anyway), modutils, module-init-tools and kmod (and several other bearable minor updates). So I tried emerging it and... BAM! Another problem appeared:

Code:
In file included from /var/tmp/portage/sys-fs/udev-215/work/systemd-215/src/libudev/libudev-private.h:30:0,
from /var/tmp/portage/sys-fs/udev-215/work/systemd-215/src/libudev/libudev.c:31:
/var/tmp/portage/sys-fs/udev-215/work/systemd-215/src/shared/util.h: In function 'safe_atolu':
/var/tmp/portage/sys-fs/udev-215/work/systemd-215/src/shared/util.h:200:9: error: #pragma GCC diagnostic not allowed inside functions
...

and several other places with the same error message. And the same when emerging eudev.
I found that it was a bug in GCC, which has been corrected in gcc-4.6 (mine was gcc-4.5.3, so looks like I need GCC update, too. What a pity that it wasn't specified as a dependency in the udev's ebuild ;-P But oh well, it happens all the time on Gentoo, nothing surprising here ;-P

Unfortunately, compiling GCC is a heat killer for my laptop's broken cooling system, so after three broken attempts I used The Doctor & miket's advice and compiled GCC on a second machine. Since my network is back, I could sftp it on the laptop and emerge --usepkgonly gcc there. Then gcc-config 2 and source /etc/profile to switch to the new compiler.

Unfortunately that wasn't the end of my problems, since some smart-pants forgot to add libtool and glibc as dependencies of gcc (as far as I know, libtool uses some hard-coded paths to GCC libraries, so it needs to be updated with GCC; and glibc is quite an obvious dependency, since libstdc++ uses it). Without glibc the compiler couldn't even run, complaining about being unable to load shared library (glibc).

What's more, switching back to the older compiler didn't helped either, since from some reasons the old libstdc++ started to use the new libc (not-yet-installed!), and the old one hasn't been retained as it is done with other unmerged libraries with the new Portage ;-P Which caused my system almost unusable for a while :-P Without the new glibc lots of system tools doesn't work, and I cannot even use the compiler! Now that's what I call a serious mess! Thanks again, Gentoo devs, for all those unspecified and circular dependencies, I just love them, because I have so much time to waste... :-P

So again I prepared binaries on my other machine and emerged them on my laptop.
Well, all except one: glibc. It turned out it doesn't want to install, showing the following error:

Code:
In order to use glibc with USE=-suid, you must make sure that you have devpts mounted at /dev/pts with the gid=5 option. Openrc should do this for you, so you should check /etc/fstab and make sure you do not have any invalid settings there.
ERROR: sys-libs/glibc-2.17::gentoo failed (preinst phase):
  mount & fix your /dev/pts settings

Sure, OpenRC would do that, providing my udev working properly :-P which is what I'm trying to do right now ;-P

But thanks for the hint, glibc ;-J I just need to do the exact opposite of what you say ;-)
So I added devpts /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 to my /etc/fstab, rebooted, and emerged glibc again. Now it installed without problems, and my toolchain is working again.

And now, FINALLY, I was able to emerge eudev without any more troubles, making my system usable again.

It still needs some revdep-rebuild and updates to bring some programs back to life after updating the system libraries. But I should handle it myself from here.

Hu wrote:
If you would like, next time you fail to provide basic information, I can wait for a clueless newbie to ask you those questions instead of asking them directly. That will likely delay service until such a clueless newbie happens by your thread, though.

Great, I mark your words on that, since your "service" weren't much helpful anyway.

Hu wrote:
Before you claim to have solved the problem, perhaps you should state which problem you think you solved.

Well, my problems were (originally only 1 and 2, and a bit of 3):
1. File collisions: SOLVED after unmerging udev-171-r6.
2. Lack of network connection due to missing networking init scripts: SOLVED by emerging netifrc (which wasn't possible until solving 1).
3. (required after 1) Emerging new udev or eudev: SOLVED after properly updating the compiler and its libs.
4. (caused by 3) Updating the toolchain on an extremely overheating laptop: SOLVED by using binary packages compiled on a second machine.
5. (caused by 4) Updating unspecified dependency, libtool: SOLVED similarly as in 4.
6. (caused by 4) Updating unspecified dependency, glibc: SOLVED after dealing with devpts.
7. (required by 6) Missing /dev/pts due to missing udev: SOLVED by mounting it by hand with proper settings.

Now when I have my network connection back and udev upgraded (as well as my compiler), all my problems are gone, since I can deal with all the rest myself.
So what I "claim" about having the problems solved is true, no matter what you may think about it, because it's not you who decide, but me. Those are my problems, so only I can judge if they're solved or not, thank you very much. As to that:

Hu wrote:
Third, you had an attitude problem.

It's funny that the only people who are telling me that, are those who have it themselves; usually those who think they're smarter than me, when I do something which proves that this is not necessarily the case. Or when they don't have much to say, but they still want to keep up the appearances of being smart.

Did you know the solution to at least ONE of my problems above? I don't think so, since you didn't provide it despite the fact that all necessary information was already there in my original post.
Would you solve it after me providing outputs form emerge --info? I don't think so either, because there's nothing more to see there which could hint for the solution. And all what really was needed, was already there in the information I provided in the very first post.

Hu wrote:
On the other hand, out-of-date systems are so often unique in their problems that your failure to provide the solution is unlikely to fail to help anyone who reads this thread months or years later.

So why do you even blame me for not providing my solution here if you're convinced it's not gonna help anyone else?
Oh, and now you even know what other people will be searching here in the future? These things are getting better and better...

Fortunately my problems are solved, so I don't need to discuss with you any more.
_________________
SasQ
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SamuliSuominen
Retired Dev
Retired Dev


Joined: 30 Sep 2005
Posts: 2133
Location: Finland

PostPosted: Sun Jul 27, 2014 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've fixed your problem (the file collision) in Portage by adding proper blockers in place that will ensure it's impossible to try to emerge netfirc with old udev.

http://sources.gentoo.org/viewvc.cgi/gentoo-x86/net-misc/netifrc/netifrc-0.2.4.ebuild?r1=1.1&r2=1.2 (And same for 0.2.2, 0.2.3 and 9999)

As for what you said about "2. This would be a pain, since udev-215 brought a whole lot of unexplained dependencies, including things like xscreensaver, audacious, konsole, subtitleeditor, ark, a whole gtk+, among other things which to me doesn't seem to be absolutely necessary to install udev o_O And I really don't know why does it pull them in as build-time dependencies."
There could be blockers that Portage take into consideration and try to resolve them by upgrading packages, but there is no direct dependency to those packages. I suspect you misread the Portage output a bit.

Anyway, I'm glad you got it sorted out!

Perhaps change $subject on this thread to say "[solved]"?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
miket
Guru
Guru


Joined: 28 Apr 2007
Posts: 412
Location: Gainesville, FL, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2014 4:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I must speak a bit in defense of Hu. He has been over the years one of the most helpful and knowledgable people on these forums and tends to stay out of heated discussions. He gets straight to the point of what people need to do to fix their systems. I have always found his answers to be very much on the mark.
miket wrote:
The answers for things (including your overheating problem) are to be found in the responses in this thread.
I'm very glad you find my suggestion helpful. By "responses to this thread", I had in mind Hu's among the those with helpful advice.

I'm sorry that this whole discussion got off into misunderstandings. Like many of the people commenting in this thread, I'm concerned that a system with a mix of very old and quite new packages is likely to be a continual source of difficulty for you. I've had great success in using the binpackage solution to bring really old Gentoo installations up to date, so that's what I offered. I think it would ultimately save you endless bother if you followed that approach fully to put everything up to date. (Oh, I wish I had known about it back in they days when we had those awful version bumps like for pam, libjpeg, or baselayout that made upgrading past them so much trouble.) While you're at it on the host where you build the packages, you could work out just what all those strange dependencies are about.

One other quick idea. If you build your kernel with hardware drivers, including the tg3 driver, in-kernel, you'd get a faster boot time and also avoid modprobe problems.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
krinn
Watchman
Watchman


Joined: 02 May 2003
Posts: 7236

PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2014 3:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sasq wrote:
Hu wrote:
Third, you had an attitude problem.

It's funny that the only people who are telling me that, are those who have it themselves; usually those who think they're smarter than me, when I do something which proves that this is not necessarily the case. Or when they don't have much to say, but they still want to keep up the appearances of being smart.

You are the only one with an attitude problem in that thread. You're rude with someone that is helping you.
It seems you get upset for the only reason Hu asked you to output emerge --info and you then must write everything by hands.

And instead of telling him that info, you goes into an condescending and rude message just to say that.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Atmmac
Tux's lil' helper
Tux's lil' helper


Joined: 17 Oct 2013
Posts: 130
Location: Watertown, MA

PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What the Hell is with blaming the gentoo dev's lately not just in this post but it others as well. These guys are putting in time and effort to make Gentoo a great distro. I can't develop worth sh*t nevermind have the time to do so. Lets show some respect.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic    Gentoo Forums Forum Index Portage & Programming All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum