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yamamushi
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Joined: 22 Mar 2004
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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 7:56 pm    Post subject: Ever wanted to learn programming fast? Reply with quote

I hope this doesn't count as spam, it shouldn't... I'm only trying to help people interested in programming.

I know that when I started programming a few years back, no one could explain concepts very well, WTF is an array? I would ask myself. I found that the problem most people have is the books they read to learn programming, there aren't very many quick resources out there that cover every topic in a clear manner. Now I know I'm going to get some replies linking to some tutorial site, etc. But the point is, there are hardly any concise resources that can give an in depth descussion to major areas of programming in a relatively short ammount of time for the complete n00b. :-P

I had the pleasure *sarcasm* of taking the computer science AP test today (as I'm sure many others did in other subjects). And for never taking a formal computer programming class, and not being very experienced with programming to begin with, I can only thank my priceless resource for helping me get through it. I purchased the Princeton Review Computer Science A/AB guide, and what it taught me with the first few pages, most of my programming books take 300 pages to teach.

Now I wouldn't reccomend it for the kind of person who needs to know exactly what is going on in the computer, but if you need to know that ( which I discovered early on) its going to be a real pain trying to learn programming at all with no prior experience. But for a book that explains variable types, operators, and control structures within 10 pages, I HIGHLY reccomend it.

--- This coming from someone who knows nothing about java, yet probably passed the AP test with only 2 nights of cramming this book into my head.

p.s.

If anyone has any other programming tutorials or resources please post them here too, I'm always adding to the collection :-P (can never have enough programming books)
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pjp
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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 8:05 pm    Post subject: Re: Ever wanted to learn programming fast? Reply with quote

yamamushi wrote:
I hope this doesn't count as spam, it shouldn't... I'm only trying to help people interested in programming.
Nah, doesn't look like it. 0 postcount with a link to a place to buy it, maybe (probably).

yamamushi wrote:
Now I know I'm going to get some replies linking to some tutorial site, etc.
I hope... still haven't found one I'd call "good." But, I can't complain too much, since they're free.

yamamushi wrote:
Princeton Review Computer Science A/AB guide, and what it taught me with the first few pages, most of my programming books take 300 pages to teach.
I'm only seeing stuff like this... same thing?
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yamamushi
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Joined: 22 Mar 2004
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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 8:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yes, thats the right link to it. Wish I had got it for 13 instead of 20 :-P
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MACSRULETHEWORLD
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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

back when i started to learn C, lots of books were of pretty much no use. most of them were WAY to advanced and assumed you already knew what arrays, pointers, and other basic elements of programming were. The Ultimate Beginners Guide to C solved all those problems. i highly reccommend it for the C n00b
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aja
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Joined: 26 Aug 2002
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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A document that concisely describes things that you have already formally studied can be invaluable for things like pre-exam review and reference. However, it is seldom the case that such documents are as useful in learning something _new_, especially if the student doesn't have a lot of exposure to similar skills (which is frequently the case for beginner programmers).

That document may seem much more useful now, but its entirely likely that it is only so because you have already spent the time with the 300 page explanations.

Your statement
Quote:

...there are hardly any concise resources that can give an in depth descussion...


betrays a bit of a oxymoron - there is a very good reason that there are few concise in-depth discussions. It's the same reason there are very few short long books.
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dat
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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 11:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Please don't use the AP CS AB test as a reference to how well you can program. I took this test and it was, by far, the easiest programming test that I've taken. Maybe my teacher was a "ball buster" or something, but his tests were much harder. You can imagine my suprise when I found out that the AB test was the harder of the two tests!

Plus, IIRC, these tests really don't take into account design principles. Relying on programming alone won't get you very far. The real money is learning how to design for a problem, and then be able to code it up (the latter being the smaller portion). (Looking back, I find it pretty odd that they call it a CS test. There's hardly any CS in it).

I don't mean to be so negative. I'm glad you did well on the AP test (did you take the A or the AB test?), but I just wanted to give you some other things to think about.

If you want a good book, pick up "Design Patterns" - great book.
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yamamushi
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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 3:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It was a simple test, but not when your the only one in the room with a big guy watching you, and the constant need to pee but your not allowed out of your seat, which is evident towards the end of my test. Bleh, ObjectOriented books.. Something about OO makes me want to throw up.
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pmazer
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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 3:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I also took the AP CS AB test... very very boring. I had about an hour remaining after the free response section, so I wrote about 3 pages of random comments about the test on that green insert. I'll put them up here when I get it back and if I remember.
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pacde
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PostPosted: Mon May 09, 2005 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just pick up Kernigan & Richie's book. Its only a couple hundred pages and will teach you more C than you will learn in a 4 year degree.

Its called "The C programming Language".

Of course you will have to come up with projects yourself, I wrote a concurrent web server (HTTP Protocol) with P-threads based primarily on things I learned in this book and a book on P-threads. Truly enormous implications.

Projects to try:

First try basic input/output - read different kinds of variables (strings, characters, floats, integers ...)
Try making methods and functions
pass by reference/ pass by value
Learn pointers - do what you have to do, make a program that walks through your inode table, write a program that explores your stack and finds the return pointers, write programs that make use of pointer arithmetic. Ive done all these.
make something usefull for your own machine - start with something simple and build on it. For me, it was a memory explorer.
A socket based server/ client to communicate (actually very simple and really useful for future projects. Everyone who wants to program should have to do this sometime)
maybe a simple web server, its cool when you connect to your own simple web server with a browser... albeit a bit dangerous.

There are a million projects to learn from but you have to start simple and use a good reference. You dont learn C from a book although a book can help you along. You learn C from programming in it. Do the traditional, start with "hello world"
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homeobocks
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PostPosted: Mon May 09, 2005 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pacde wrote:
Just pick up Kernigan & Richie's book. Its only a couple hundred pages and will teach you more C than you will learn in a 4 year degree.

Its called "The C programming Language".


Best written book I've ever read. Might be a tad hard to learn C from.
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AdShea
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PostPosted: Mon May 09, 2005 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I learned C from the old version, but the new one has many more examples at only twice the thickness8) . Best programming book ever. However VB3 for Dummies comes close
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AdShea
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PostPosted: Mon May 09, 2005 10:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I learned C from the old version, but the new one has many more examples at only twice the thickness 8) . Best programming book ever. However VB3 for Dummies comes close
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