Gentoo Forums
Gentoo Forums
Gentoo Forums
Quick Search: in
EdgeRouter-X
View unanswered posts
View posts from last 24 hours

 
Reply to topic    Gentoo Forums Forum Index Other Things Gentoo
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Tony0945
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 25 Jul 2006
Posts: 4297
Location: Illinois, USA

PostPosted: Sat Sep 19, 2020 1:05 am    Post subject: EdgeRouter-X Reply with quote

I've been intrigued by the Ubiquiti EdgeRouters for quite a while. I finally bought the EdgeRouter-X four port direct from the manufacturer for $59 US.
Yesterday I tried setting it up. The default address is 192.168.1.1 and the default LAN is 192.168.1.XXX. I read that the Operating System was a derivative of Debian. People said the GUI was opaque and the real goodies were in the CLI whih had obscure commands.
The GUI is not as straightforward as I would like, not like the DLink GUI for instance. But the CLI is just a Linux terminal! Complete with the usual "exotic" commands like 'cat`, 'grep' and so forth. Unfortunately neither nano, vi, nor vim exist. That's really too bad, because I would like to change the syslog configuration file. On the other hand, although the GUI arrangement is not intuitive, it is clearer to me what happens than with the DLink GUI which trys to hide what is happening technically.

Since my existing network is based on the DLINK standard, I figured it would be easier to change the router than every computer. So I disconnected my server, which is located feet from the cable modem and router and eight port switch and plugged it into the Edgerouter. I ediited /etc/conf.d/net (I'm an OpenRC guy). The original default line calling "config_eth0="dhcp" was still there commented out, so I uncommented it and commented out the line assigning 192.168.0.102. Then rebooted? NO! This isn't windoze, it's Gentoo. So I ran "service net.etho restart". This caused moaning and groaning from samba but it settled down and ifconfig showed a connection at 192.168.1.38. I then fired up the Palemoon browser and pointed it to https://192.168.1.1 as instructed. The GUI came up and I changed the default password. Also put a bookmark in the browser toolbar.
Somewhere, a bit obscure, I found the network settings and changed the router's ip address and the network specification. Then pressed "save". I immediately lost the GUI of course. So again "service net.eth0 restart" and now I'm 192.168.0.39. I edited my bookmark, logged in with the new password. A surprise! Palemoon offered to save the password and now I never have to type it again.

More investigation, into the default firewall. Default on the wan port (eth0) is DROP. There is one rule, ACCEPT established and related. That's it! All my angst in a fairly recent thread (August?) when I was trying to make a a k-6III gentoo router was for nought. that's it. tighter than a drum and it works. I can web surf, get and send e-mail and run eix-sync. Perfect. From that point, it was a simple matter to assign static addresses according to the table that I had printed previous from the DLINK.

Next stop, turning the DLINK router into an access point. I unplugged, plugged into the DLINK and changed the default address to 192.168.0.2 and turned off DHCP. Supposedly this was enough to turn it into an AP. But I couldn't get the Amazon Firestick or the Samsung television to connect. I did get a Windows laptop to connect but even accessing the DLINK GUI was choppy and prone to stalling. Then I remembered that I have a DAP-1522 Bridge/AP that I used to use a wireless bridge before I got a cat 6 wire up from the basement to my second floor library (really bedroom #2 with no bed, a lot of bookcases and a desk). I flipped the switch from bridge to AP. I had previously tried using it as an AP to no avail. With the EdgeRouter it worked perfectly. I had a different SSID from the DLINK all-in-one router, so I had to tell the devices to use that one and use the remotes to enter the passphrases. Entering the passphrases with remotes was the hardest part of the whole adventure. Best of all the DAp-1522 is dual band and the router was not. Setting up QOS was easy too with GUI fields for maximum throughput both ways. the DLink never mentioned throughput numbers, just "typical applications" like "video, gaming" and the like for choices. I'm an engineer I like numbers. Nay, I LOVE numbers.

So there it is. I'm very pleased, but my internet service is only 30M down and 5M up. I've read the ER-X chipset and memory aren't enough for anything over 450. I'm a long way from that. Ubiquiti has Edgerouters to handle Gigabit service, but that costs around $400, not $59.
I'm extremely pleased to have separate units for router, AP, and switch (TP-Link eight port unmanaged rack mountable). I also have a Buffalo $14 router/AP that I bought on clearance for $11. It is dual band and switchable between router and AP by virtual button on the interface. It already was 192.168.0.3 (not the default). Can't say much for the Buffalo except it's cheap and it works. It has pre-programmed reboots to fix memory leaks! Instead of fixing the damn code! But it works. I get connection in the kitchen which is a very bad spot because of metal appliances and metal ductwork just below. I mounted the Buffalo in the basement just below the mini-tv with attached Roku and Firestick using a 50 foot cat 5e cable. Using the 5.0 band helped a lot with interference from nearby strong (possibly illegal) 2.4 transmitters.

That's my experience so far. Anyone else using an EdgeRouter and care to comment on their experience?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pjp
Administrator
Administrator


Joined: 16 Apr 2002
Posts: 18593

PostPosted: Sat Sep 19, 2020 1:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been curious about the brand in general, but haven't decided to buy yet. In part because of past security issues, but also in part due to what seems like an overly complicated product line. Some products require their centralized configuration mechanism (Cloud Key I think). I'd also prefer to be able to replace their OS. Not sure if that is reasonably possible. I had hoped to find a reasonable replacement for all-in-one devices, but I'm not seeing what I'd prefer.
_________________
Your lips move, but I can't hear what you're saying.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tony0945
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 25 Jul 2006
Posts: 4297
Location: Illinois, USA

PostPosted: Sat Sep 19, 2020 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pjp wrote:
I'd also prefer to be able to replace their OS.

Yes, if nothing else, it's an example of a Linux based router.

I do like having separate router & AP functions. The switch part can be programmed to different networks which is good. I have a phone and a laptop to connect wireless. All the others are IOT. I'd like to connect the IOT stuff a separate network to keep it away from the PC's. Just pop into eth2 and do your thing with downloading movies, whatever. Got a bug? A vulnerability? Keep it away from the PC's and who cares? I will need one or two more AP's for the phone and laptop. The DAP-1522 is only available used for outrageous prices ($400 used!). Modern "AP's" are really wireless repeaters. Reviews of routers focus exclusively on their wireless performance. OK, I'm a grumpy old man this morning.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pa4wdh
Guru
Guru


Joined: 16 Dec 2005
Posts: 410

PostPosted: Sat Sep 19, 2020 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some time ago I was looking for new home-router hardware and I did consider EdgeRouter's hardware, they have nice hardware for a good price. The biggest letdown for me is that I can't run gentoo on it to make my own gentoo based router-os. I ended up with a PC-Engines APU4d4: https://pcengines.ch/apu4d4.htm
_________________
The gentoo way of bringing peace to the world:
USE="-war" emerge --newuse @world

Free as in Freedom is not limited to software only:
Music: http://www.jamendo.com
Recipes: http://www.opensourcefood.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Etal
Veteran
Veteran


Joined: 15 Jul 2005
Posts: 1832

PostPosted: Sat Sep 19, 2020 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wait, so Tony uses a router with systemd on it??? 8O 8O 8O

Not that there's anything wrong with that, of course! :lol:

If you want to install an editor, you can add Debian repositories, since EdgeOS is essentially Debian with some proprietary bits on top. But careful with editing files because they might be wiped on reboot unless you use their "configure" cli tool.

I personally installed OpenWRT on mine. The only thing I miss is the deep packet inspection feature which was kinda neat.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tony0945
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 25 Jul 2006
Posts: 4297
Location: Illinois, USA

PostPosted: Sat Sep 19, 2020 4:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Etal wrote:
Wait, so Tony uses a router with systemd on it??? 8O 8O 8O

LOL! I even use Windoze when I must! I'd rather have Gentoo! With OpenRC of course. Soon I'll have a Phenom II computer free and I might try using that instead of the k6. Primarily because it has PCIe and 8G memory. The memory is light for a PC, but plenty for a router.

Thanks for the input! I'd like to know more about how to install OpenWRT. I was going to do that on a compatible TP Link router, but the constant "WARNING! THIS MAY BRICK YOUR DEVICE!" deterred me. I don't even update firmware because of the drumbeat of warnings which sound like bricking is more likely than not. I've updated PC BIOS but always with my heart in my mouth. I did like Gigabyte's dual-bios which allowed for a fallback.

EDIT: the Dlink is a DIR-655, noted as "end of life" by Dlink but on sale for $98 used on Amazon! 50% more than the ER-X !
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tony0945
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 25 Jul 2006
Posts: 4297
Location: Illinois, USA

PostPosted: Sat Sep 19, 2020 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pa4wdh wrote:
The biggest letdown for me is that I can't run gentoo on it to make my own gentoo based router-os. I ended up with a PC-Engines APU4d4: https://pcengines.ch/apu4d4.htm
Interesting? Did you install Gentoo on it?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Etal
Veteran
Veteran


Joined: 15 Jul 2005
Posts: 1832

PostPosted: Sat Sep 19, 2020 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tony0945 wrote:
Thanks for the input! I'd like to know more about how to install OpenWRT. I was going to do that on a compatible TP Link router, but the constant "WARNING! THIS MAY BRICK YOUR DEVICE!" deterred me. I don't even update firmware because of the drumbeat of warnings which sound like bricking is more likely than not. I've updated PC BIOS but always with my heart in my mouth. I did like Gigabyte's dual-bios which allowed for a fallback.


Apparently it's possible to upgrade from EdgeOS to OpenWRT directly with some combination of versions of EdgeOS and OpenWRT, but I used Serial installation with TFTP method. It requires a screwdriver and a USB-to-TTL cable, but I think that's the least scary method since you can see what's happening. A USB-to-TTL adapter costs only a few bucks but is super useful to have.

OpenWRT itself is pretty neat. You can install a pre-built image and then install all sorts of additional packages with opkg like on a regular distro. Or you can build it from source (it will bootstrap the compiler and set up everything for you, it's surprisingly painless) and customize it with a kconfig-like menu The OS itself is tiny since most routers have nowhere near as much RAM/Flash as the ER-X.

Code:
  _______                     ________        __
 |       |.-----.-----.-----.|  |  |  |.----.|  |_
 |   -   ||  _  |  -__|     ||  |  |  ||   _||   _|
 |_______||   __|_____|__|__||________||__|  |____|
          |__| W I R E L E S S   F R E E D O M
 -----------------------------------------------------
 OpenWrt 19.07.2, r10947-65030d81f3
 -----------------------------------------------------
# uname -a
Linux xxx 4.14.171 #0 SMP Thu Feb 27 21:05:12 2020 mips GNU/Linux
# free
              total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
Mem:         253504       31688      168988       31636       52828      156632
Swap:             0           0           0
# df -h
Filesystem                Size      Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/root                 5.5M      5.5M         0 100% /rom
tmpfs                   123.8M     30.3M     93.4M  25% /tmp
/dev/ubi0_1             209.9M    700.0K    204.5M   0% /overlay
overlayfs:/overlay      209.9M    700.0K    204.5M   0% /
tmpfs                   512.0K         0    512.0K   0% /dev
# uptime
 13:44:39 up 189 days,  3:30,  load average: 0.01, 0.02, 0.00
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tony0945
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 25 Jul 2006
Posts: 4297
Location: Illinois, USA

PostPosted: Sat Sep 19, 2020 8:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the link! I never had a link to the source before. Only pre-compiled binaries.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pa4wdh
Guru
Guru


Joined: 16 Dec 2005
Posts: 410

PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2020 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tony0945 wrote:
pa4wdh wrote:
The biggest letdown for me is that I can't run gentoo on it to make my own gentoo based router-os. I ended up with a PC-Engines APU4d4: https://pcengines.ch/apu4d4.htm
Interesting? Did you install Gentoo on it?
Of course :)

For storage I use an internal SDcard (called pseudoSLC), which contains /boot, grub, a sysrescuecd image for when stuff goes wrogn, kernels en ramdisk images. Next to that I use an external USB SSD which contains my normal gentoo setup which i update in the usual ways. From that install i create ramdisk images (stored in the SDcard) which only contain what i need, they are currently about 56 MB in size and include: dhcp server and client, radvd, pppoe (for dsl), rrdtool, thttpd, openvpn with hardware tokens, nftables, ssh, scp, bind and ntp.
When the system is in normal use it runs the ramdisk image, every three months i boot from the USB SSD to update, create a new image and boot to the new image. Because I have only a small amount of packages installed updates are usually smooth, they just take quite some time (especially gcc).
_________________
The gentoo way of bringing peace to the world:
USE="-war" emerge --newuse @world

Free as in Freedom is not limited to software only:
Music: http://www.jamendo.com
Recipes: http://www.opensourcefood.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tony0945
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 25 Jul 2006
Posts: 4297
Location: Illinois, USA

PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2020 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I missed that the CPU code name is Jaguar https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaguar_%28microarchitecture%29
Instead of building on the unit itself, maybe using a Ryzen buildbox? I haven't compared the instruction sets yet. I use a 2700X to build big packages for for Phenom II and a Phenom II to build 32 bit packages for a k6-3. Except for eix which has some hidden use of a instruction from the build box. It crashes on the k6 (independently verified).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pa4wdh
Guru
Guru


Joined: 16 Dec 2005
Posts: 410

PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2020 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even when using my full bandwidth (70 Mbit/s down, 20 Mbit/s up) and 5000+ concurrent connections the system load is still 0.01 :lol: so even when it's compiling it still performs pretty well.
So besides the fact that it takes time, I barely notice it's working. That's why i don't feel the need to build on a different PC, and it saves me all the headaches from setting it up properly :) I like it to be completely self-supporting.

The CPU is indeed a Jaguar GX-412TC , it also has the Crypto Co-Processor which has hardware acceleration for a lot of algorithms, which is quite useful when using VPN's :)
_________________
The gentoo way of bringing peace to the world:
USE="-war" emerge --newuse @world

Free as in Freedom is not limited to software only:
Music: http://www.jamendo.com
Recipes: http://www.opensourcefood.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AJM
Tux's lil' helper
Tux's lil' helper


Joined: 25 Sep 2002
Posts: 142
Location: Aberdeen, Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Sep 22, 2020 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

pjp wrote:
I've been curious about the brand in general, but haven't decided to buy yet. In part because of past security issues, but also in part due to what seems like an overly complicated product line. Some products require their centralized configuration mechanism (Cloud Key I think).


Their product lines ARE overly complicated, though there are two main ones - those managed by the UNMS controller and those managed by the UNIFI controller. UNMS is for the infrastructure related ones (targeting WISPs mainly) which includes the EdgeRouter here and their AirOS wireless bridges etc. These devices do not actually require a separate controller and can be configured individually as Tony has done - the controller just provides an easy way to monitor your services and re-provision new hardware. The UNMS controller can either be hosted by them, for free - strangely, only if you have more than 10 devices though! or you can run it yourself on a VM, it's a docker setup.

The UniFi line is more aimed at WiFi provision to end users whether hotels / offices / homes or whatever, though the line does include some pretty simple (limited) routers and managed switches. These devices realistically all need to be configured through the UniFi controller which again can be run on a VM (there's a Ubuntu/Debian repository for it), "cloud" hosted or you can buy the "cloudkey" which is just a ready-to-go single board computer set up with the UniFi software. Once configured, the UniFi devices will work fine without the controller running - it's only required for a few features like captive portals etc.
One controller can manage lots of different networks so it becomes more convenient the more devices you deploy - also, deploying a new or replacement device to an existing network is really trivial.

The real mess is when you look at other UniFi branded things like cameras - they say UniFi, but actually require a completely different controller. That was particularly dumb...

Generally though the stuff is good value for money, easy to set up and manage and also very reliable - so long as you don't blindly update the controller every time a "stable" release comes through!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DaggyStyle
Watchman
Watchman


Joined: 22 Mar 2006
Posts: 5608

PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2020 9:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Etal wrote:
OpenWRT itself is pretty neat. You can install a pre-built image and then install all sorts of additional packages with opkg like on a regular distro. Or you can build it from source (it will bootstrap the compiler and set up everything for you, it's surprisingly painless) and customize it with a kconfig-like menu The OS itself is tiny since most routers have nowhere near as much RAM/Flash as the ER-X.

Code:
  _______                     ________        __
 |       |.-----.-----.-----.|  |  |  |.----.|  |_
 |   -   ||  _  |  -__|     ||  |  |  ||   _||   _|
 |_______||   __|_____|__|__||________||__|  |____|
          |__| W I R E L E S S   F R E E D O M
 -----------------------------------------------------
 OpenWrt 19.07.2, r10947-65030d81f3
 -----------------------------------------------------
# uname -a
Linux xxx 4.14.171 #0 SMP Thu Feb 27 21:05:12 2020 mips GNU/Linux
# free
              total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
Mem:         253504       31688      168988       31636       52828      156632
Swap:             0           0           0
# df -h
Filesystem                Size      Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/root                 5.5M      5.5M         0 100% /rom
tmpfs                   123.8M     30.3M     93.4M  25% /tmp
/dev/ubi0_1             209.9M    700.0K    204.5M   0% /overlay
overlayfs:/overlay      209.9M    700.0K    204.5M   0% /
tmpfs                   512.0K         0    512.0K   0% /dev
# uptime
 13:44:39 up 189 days,  3:30,  load average: 0.01, 0.02, 0.00

+1 about openwrt

I'm running my self compiled openwrt over a vm (2 cpus, 512GB ram) which runs atop of an Intel based home server (host is gentoo :D)
works faster than my ISP issued dlink.
not to mentioned that the wireless is patched againts krack attacks.
_________________
Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity and I'm not sure about the former - Albert Einstein
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic    Gentoo Forums Forum Index Other Things Gentoo All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum