Gentoo Forums
Gentoo Forums
Gentoo Forums
Quick Search: in
Alsamixer "this sound device does not have any controls"
View unanswered posts
View posts from last 24 hours

 
Reply to topic    Gentoo Forums Forum Index Multimedia
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Tomogui
n00b
n00b


Joined: 27 Aug 2016
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 4:54 pm    Post subject: Alsamixer "this sound device does not have any controls Reply with quote

Hello fellow gentooers!
After a fresh install of gentoo, i have encountered the following problem:
Alsa doesn't seem to recognize my sound-card. i wonder why?
Some info:
linux-firmware is installed. alsasound is set to start on boot.
Code:
lspci -v
00:1b.0 Audio device: Intel Corporation 8 Series/C220 Series Chipset High Definition Audio Controller (rev 05)
   Subsystem: ASRock Incorporation 8 Series/C220 Series Chipset High Definition Audio Controller
   Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 22
   Memory at f3130000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=16K]
   Capabilities: [50] Power Management version 2
   Capabilities: [60] MSI: Enable- Count=1/1 Maskable- 64bit+
   Capabilities: [70] Express Root Complex Integrated Endpoint, MSI 00
   Capabilities: [100] Virtual Channel
   Kernel driver in use: snd_hda_intel
01:00.1 Audio device: NVIDIA Corporation GK104 HDMI Audio Controller (rev a1)
   Subsystem: Micro-Star International Co., Ltd. [MSI] GK104 HDMI Audio Controller
   Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 17
   Memory at f3080000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=16K]
   Capabilities: [60] Power Management version 3
   Capabilities: [68] MSI: Enable- Count=1/1 Maskable- 64bit+
   Capabilities: [78] Express Endpoint, MSI 00
   Kernel driver in use: snd_hda_intel


Code:
cat .config | grep -i SND
CONFIG_SND=y
CONFIG_SND_TIMER=y
CONFIG_SND_PCM=y
CONFIG_SND_HWDEP=y
CONFIG_SND_JACK=y
CONFIG_SND_JACK_INPUT_DEV=y
CONFIG_SND_SEQUENCER=y
CONFIG_SND_SEQ_DUMMY=y
CONFIG_SND_OSSEMUL=y
CONFIG_SND_MIXER_OSS=y
CONFIG_SND_PCM_OSS=y
CONFIG_SND_PCM_OSS_PLUGINS=y
CONFIG_SND_PCM_TIMER=y
CONFIG_SND_SEQUENCER_OSS=y
CONFIG_SND_HRTIMER=y
CONFIG_SND_SEQ_HRTIMER_DEFAULT=y
# CONFIG_SND_DYNAMIC_MINORS is not set
# CONFIG_SND_SUPPORT_OLD_API is not set
CONFIG_SND_PROC_FS=y
CONFIG_SND_VERBOSE_PROCFS=y
# CONFIG_SND_VERBOSE_PRINTK is not set
# CONFIG_SND_DEBUG is not set
CONFIG_SND_VMASTER=y
CONFIG_SND_DMA_SGBUF=y
# CONFIG_SND_RAWMIDI_SEQ is not set
# CONFIG_SND_OPL3_LIB_SEQ is not set
# CONFIG_SND_OPL4_LIB_SEQ is not set
# CONFIG_SND_SBAWE_SEQ is not set
# CONFIG_SND_EMU10K1_SEQ is not set
# CONFIG_SND_DRIVERS is not set
CONFIG_SND_PCI=y
# CONFIG_SND_AD1889 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_ALS300 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_ALS4000 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_ALI5451 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_ASIHPI is not set
# CONFIG_SND_ATIIXP is not set
# CONFIG_SND_ATIIXP_MODEM is not set
# CONFIG_SND_AU8810 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_AU8820 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_AU8830 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_AW2 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_AZT3328 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_BT87X is not set
# CONFIG_SND_CA0106 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_CMIPCI is not set
# CONFIG_SND_OXYGEN is not set
# CONFIG_SND_CS4281 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_CS46XX is not set
# CONFIG_SND_CTXFI is not set
# CONFIG_SND_DARLA20 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_GINA20 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_LAYLA20 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_DARLA24 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_GINA24 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_LAYLA24 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_MONA is not set
# CONFIG_SND_MIA is not set
# CONFIG_SND_ECHO3G is not set
# CONFIG_SND_INDIGO is not set
# CONFIG_SND_INDIGOIO is not set
# CONFIG_SND_INDIGODJ is not set
# CONFIG_SND_INDIGOIOX is not set
# CONFIG_SND_INDIGODJX is not set
# CONFIG_SND_EMU10K1 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_EMU10K1X is not set
# CONFIG_SND_ENS1370 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_ENS1371 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_ES1938 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_ES1968 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_FM801 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_HDSP is not set
# CONFIG_SND_HDSPM is not set
# CONFIG_SND_ICE1712 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_ICE1724 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_INTEL8X0 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_INTEL8X0M is not set
# CONFIG_SND_KORG1212 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_LOLA is not set
# CONFIG_SND_LX6464ES is not set
# CONFIG_SND_MAESTRO3 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_MIXART is not set
# CONFIG_SND_NM256 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_PCXHR is not set
# CONFIG_SND_RIPTIDE is not set
# CONFIG_SND_RME32 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_RME96 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_RME9652 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_SE6X is not set
# CONFIG_SND_SONICVIBES is not set
# CONFIG_SND_TRIDENT is not set
# CONFIG_SND_VIA82XX is not set
# CONFIG_SND_VIA82XX_MODEM is not set
# CONFIG_SND_VIRTUOSO is not set
# CONFIG_SND_VX222 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_YMFPCI is not set
CONFIG_SND_HDA=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_INTEL=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_HWDEP=y
# CONFIG_SND_HDA_RECONFIG is not set
# CONFIG_SND_HDA_INPUT_BEEP is not set
# CONFIG_SND_HDA_PATCH_LOADER is not set
CONFIG_SND_HDA_CODEC_REALTEK=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_CODEC_ANALOG=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_CODEC_SIGMATEL=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_CODEC_VIA=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_CODEC_HDMI=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_CODEC_CIRRUS=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_CODEC_CONEXANT=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_CODEC_CA0110=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_CODEC_CA0132=y
# CONFIG_SND_HDA_CODEC_CA0132_DSP is not set
CONFIG_SND_HDA_CODEC_CMEDIA=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_CODEC_SI3054=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_GENERIC=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_POWER_SAVE_DEFAULT=0
CONFIG_SND_HDA_CORE=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_I915=y
CONFIG_SND_HDA_PREALLOC_SIZE=2048
CONFIG_SND_USB=y
# CONFIG_SND_USB_AUDIO is not set
# CONFIG_SND_USB_UA101 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_USB_USX2Y is not set
# CONFIG_SND_USB_CAIAQ is not set
# CONFIG_SND_USB_US122L is not set
# CONFIG_SND_USB_6FIRE is not set
# CONFIG_SND_USB_HIFACE is not set
# CONFIG_SND_BCD2000 is not set
# CONFIG_SND_USB_POD is not set
# CONFIG_SND_USB_PODHD is not set
# CONFIG_SND_USB_TONEPORT is not set
# CONFIG_SND_USB_VARIAX is not set
# CONFIG_SND_SOC is not set
# CONFIG_SND_X86 is not set

Code:
/etc/modprobe.d # cat alsa.conf
# Alsa kernel modules' configuration file.

# ALSA portion
alias char-major-116 snd
# OSS/Free portion
alias char-major-14 soundcore

##
## IMPORTANT:
## You need to customise this section for your specific sound card(s)
## and then run `update-modules' command.
## Read alsa-driver's INSTALL file in /usr/share/doc for more info.
##
##  ALSA portion
alias snd-card-0 snd-hda-intel
## alias snd-card-1 snd-ens1371
##  OSS/Free portion
alias sound-slot-0 snd-card-0
## alias sound-slot-1 snd-card-1
##

# OSS/Free portion - card #1
alias sound-service-0-0 snd-mixer-oss
alias sound-service-0-1 snd-seq-oss
alias sound-service-0-3 snd-pcm-oss
alias sound-service-0-8 snd-seq-oss
alias sound-service-0-12 snd-pcm-oss
##  OSS/Free portion - card #2
## alias sound-service-1-0 snd-mixer-oss
## alias sound-service-1-3 snd-pcm-oss
## alias sound-service-1-12 snd-pcm-oss

alias /dev/mixer snd-mixer-oss
alias /dev/dsp snd-pcm-oss
alias /dev/midi snd-seq-oss

# Set this to the correct number of cards.
options snd cards_limit=1


Thanks for your help! :)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jaglover
Watchman
Watchman


Joined: 29 May 2005
Posts: 5953
Location: Saint Amant, Acadiana

PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe building in all those HDA drivers is not a very good idea.
That said, I can't tell what is wrong. But I can tell how I would approach this problem. I'd boot from install media (Sysrescue that is) and check what modules are in use for sound.
_________________
Please learn how to denote units correctly!

Political Correctness is all about replacing imaginary injustice with real injustice.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
NeddySeagoon
Administrator
Administrator


Joined: 05 Jul 2003
Posts: 39264
Location: 56N 3W

PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tomogui,

All your sound support is built into the kernel, so alsa.conf cannot be used.
Its required when the modules are loaded.

Your default audio device will be
Code:
00:1b.0 Audio device: Intel Corporation 8 Series/C220 Series Chipset High Definition Audio Controller (rev 05)
so it will have all the controls you expect.
Your second sound card, for sound over HDMI is
Code:
01:00.1 Audio device: NVIDIA Corporation GK104 HDMI Audio Controller (rev a1)
may not actually have any controls.
It might have a mute switch.

What do you have in /dev/snd/

What does alsamixer -c0 and alsamixer -c1 show.
_________________
Regards,

NeddySeagoon

Computer users fall into two groups:-
those that do backups
those that have never had a hard drive fail.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LIsLinuxIsSogood
Guru
Guru


Joined: 13 Feb 2016
Posts: 456

PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
What do you have in /dev/snd/


Just per Neddy, here's another way to check you hardware configuration...

Code:

user $cat /sys/class/sound/card*/id


After that, you may have theinfo needed to go through with configuration files for ALSA, but as mentioned before me the possibilities should be very clear - first see if the hardware works with current kernel configuration, just to save some time, or else if you have any doubts there or want to go through the work of cleaning up the kernel a bit, then start with the suggested kernel route that will of course take a bit of time, though.

There is a quote from the wiki that says something like this:


Quote:
One of the simplest changes is card and device.


Check in the FILE ~/.asoundrc OR /etc/asound.conf, changing the defaults for card and device, using Names is always better than numbers, hence the code at the top for extracting the names that udev applies to sound card devices for your computer.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tomogui
n00b
n00b


Joined: 27 Aug 2016
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the replies,

Jaglover
NeddySeagoon
LIsLinuxIsSogood :)

Jaglover wrote:
I'd boot from install media (Sysrescue that is) and check what modules are in use for sound.

That's a good idea :) If I don't get it to working, I'll definitely try it this way!

NeddySeagoon wrote:
What do you have in /dev/snd/

What does alsamixer -c0 and alsamixer -c1 show.


Code:
ls -lsa /dev/snd
total 0
0 drwxr-xr-x  3 root root      180 Nov 28  2017 .
0 drwxr-xr-x 15 root root     4520 Nov 28 21:44 ..
0 drwxr-xr-x  2 root root       80 Nov 28  2017 by-path
0 crw-rw----  1 root audio 116,  0 Nov 28  2017 controlC0
0 crw-rw----  1 root audio 116, 32 Nov 28  2017 controlC1
0 crw-rw----  1 root audio 116,  4 Nov 28  2017 hwC0D0
0 crw-rw----  1 root audio 116, 36 Nov 28  2017 hwC1D0
0 crw-rw----  1 root audio 116,  1 Nov 28  2017 seq
0 crw-rw----  1 root audio 116, 33 Nov 28  2017 timer


Both alsamixer -c0 and alsamixer -c1 open up alsamixer and the program tells me, that this device doesn't have any controls. :/

LIsLinuxIsSogood wrote:
user $cat /sys/class/sound/card*/id

Code:
cat /sys/class/sound/card*/id
PCH
NVidia

LIsLinuxIsSogood wrote:
Check in the FILE ~/.asoundrc OR /etc/asound.conf, changing the defaults for card and device, using Names is always better than numbers, hence the code at the top for extracting the names that udev applies to sound card devices for your computer.

Both of the mentioned files are non-existent on my system. Maybe that's part of the issue?

Cheers :)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
NeddySeagoon
Administrator
Administrator


Joined: 05 Jul 2003
Posts: 39264
Location: 56N 3W

PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tomogui,

Sound cards are in two pieces. The PCI bun end, that lspci shows.
The analogue I/O end, which is the codec.

Its not quite that simple. Sometimes you need to pass module parameters to the sound card driver to tell it how the codec is connected.
Before we go there, make friends with wgetpaste and pastebin your dmesg output, we can check that there are no nasty sound related messages there.

Your /dev/snd/ appears to be missing lots of devices.

-- edit --

~/.asoundrc and /etc/asound.conf are both user created files. If you don't have them it may not matter.
At least, its not the problem yet.
_________________
Regards,

NeddySeagoon

Computer users fall into two groups:-
those that do backups
those that have never had a hard drive fail.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tomogui
n00b
n00b


Joined: 27 Aug 2016
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NeddySeagoon wrote:
Tomogui,

Sound cards are in two pieces. The PCI bun end, that lspci shows.
The analogue I/O end, which is the codec.

Its not quite that simple. Sometimes you need to pass module parameters to the sound card driver to tell it how the codec is connected.
Before we go there, make friends with wgetpaste and pastebin your dmesg output, we can check that there are no nasty sound related messages there.

Your /dev/snd/ appears to be missing lots of devices.

-- edit --

~/.asoundrc and /etc/asound.conf are both user created files. If you don't have them it may not matter.
At least, its not the problem yet.


Thanks for the quick reply :)
All of this seems very weird. I did install Gentoo on this machine before in the past and never encountered any similar problems. I wonder what I did differently. ^^;
Here's my dmesg:
http://dpaste.com/0YTTT0P

Cheers :)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
NeddySeagoon
Administrator
Administrator


Joined: 05 Jul 2003
Posts: 39264
Location: 56N 3W

PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tomogui,

Ahh ... you have at least some debug options on. Hence all the logspam.

Some debug options are harmless.
Others generate a lot of log entries and slow things down.
Yet others are invasive to the point of preventing normal operation.
They all have one thing in common - they are for use by kernel developers.

Rebuild your kernel with all the debug option off, unless you read the help and decide you want a particular option.

Your dmesg only shows a blow by blow account of USB transfers because of the debug options.

For sound, these options
Code:
# CONFIG_SND_VERBOSE_PROCFS is not set
# CONFIG_SND_VERBOSE_PRINTK is not set
# CONFIG_SND_DEBUG is not set
must all be off.

When you reboot into your new kernel, run
Code:
uname-a
and check that the build date/time is what you are expecting.
_________________
Regards,

NeddySeagoon

Computer users fall into two groups:-
those that do backups
those that have never had a hard drive fail.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
krinn
Watchman
Watchman


Joined: 02 May 2003
Posts: 5966

PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 12:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NeddySeagoon wrote:
Ahh ... you have at least some debug options on. Hence all the logspam.

Or more because he show dmesg output after a long time, he start at 3666.206854 :)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LIsLinuxIsSogood
Guru
Guru


Joined: 13 Feb 2016
Posts: 456

PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 4:31 am    Post subject: Determing the extent of the problem Reply with quote

EDIT: fyi, just saw krinn's post and looking at the dmesg output, does anyone know what all that kernel messaging is saying? Not too sure myself after looking just briefly at it.

Tomogui,

In response to the concerns,ongoing I hope this gives you some more to think/work on, while you can continue if not the route of debugging by through the kernel, which isn't a solution per se, but will help figure out what is wrong with it so I offer my two cents in there as well.

NeddySeagoon said:
Quote:
Your /dev/snd/ appears to be missing lots of devices.


From an audio standpoint, it would appear that what IS in that folder is you have the controls, and hardware plugs as well as sequencer and timer working (see below). So I think the hardware could be working fine, and you will want a way of testing that directly, which luckily due to the low level (of ALSA) is possible without modifying any files. Start with aplay -l to get a list of the devices, and then using aplay -D with the device name or plug for the card/cards connected.

You may want to have a sound file (like a .wav or something like that) to test. If not, you can use other files they will just make loud noise I think instead). Here is an example of aplay command with -D, you need to modify to your hardware, based on the output you provided, I think it will be either 0,0 or 1,0 that will be the change, OK?

Code:
mplayer -ao alsa:device=hw=1.0 groovy.mp3


This is if you have mplayer installed, but if not and you still want to use hardware plugs, as opposed to device names, it should be possible to get that from aplay, and then do something like this...

Code:
aplay -D front:CARD=card1,DEV=device1 somefile.wav"


Again make sure to substitute the correct hardware information, I think it is either going to be 0,0 or 1,0 according to here...

Code:
ls -lsa /dev/snd
total 0
0 drwxr-xr-x  3 root root      180 Nov 28  2017 .
0 drwxr-xr-x 15 root root     4520 Nov 28 21:44 ..
0 drwxr-xr-x  2 root root       80 Nov 28  2017 by-path
0 crw-rw----  1 root audio 116,  0 Nov 28  2017 controlC0
0 crw-rw----  1 root audio 116, 32 Nov 28  2017 controlC1
0 crw-rw----  1 root audio 116,  4 Nov 28  2017 hwC0D0
0 crw-rw----  1 root audio 116, 36 Nov 28  2017 hwC1D0
0 crw-rw----  1 root audio 116,  1 Nov 28  2017 seq
0 crw-rw----  1 root audio 116, 33 Nov 28  2017 timer



Not to take away from idea of debugging it further, but just to make sure it isn't as simple as configuring the alsa server or client or any of it, just go through some quick steps I laid out and see if there is or isn't sound that will be a tell tale sign that you need to make some larger changes, such as either removing or adding to the kernel at that point.

Here's an example of my own /dev/snd so you can see what it looks like after the fact*
Code:
Machine_West% ls -l /dev/snd
total 0
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root       80 Nov 28 17:53 by-path
crw-rw----+ 1 root audio 116,  5 Nov 28 17:53 controlC0
crw-rw----+ 1 root audio 116,  2 Nov 28 17:53 controlC1
crw-rw----+ 1 root audio 116, 10 Nov 28 17:53 pcmC0D10p
crw-rw----+ 1 root audio 116,  6 Nov 28 17:53 pcmC0D3p
crw-rw----+ 1 root audio 116,  7 Nov 28 17:53 pcmC0D7p
crw-rw----+ 1 root audio 116,  8 Nov 28 17:53 pcmC0D8p
crw-rw----+ 1 root audio 116,  9 Nov 28 17:53 pcmC0D9p
crw-rw----+ 1 root audio 116,  4 Nov 28 17:53 pcmC1D0c
crw-rw----+ 1 root audio 116,  3 Nov 28 19:04 pcmC1D0p
crw-rw----  1 root audio 116,  1 Nov 28 17:53 seq
crw-rw----+ 1 root audio 116, 33 Nov 28 17:53 timer


See that's not all that different, just a bunch of the additional pcm channels which are for mixing, I believe.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
NeddySeagoon
Administrator
Administrator


Joined: 05 Jul 2003
Posts: 39264
Location: 56N 3W

PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LIsLinuxIsSogood,

pcmC0D10p, That's Card 0, Device 10, (stereo) playback. pcm means its an analogue output, it will have a slider control and mute switch.

Digital outputs don't have volume controls as changing the volume in the digital domain is hard.
You would need to demultiplex the stream, process each sample separately, then remultiplex the stream.
Not all digital outputs have a mute control.

As all the pcm devices are missing, the only controls that may be present are digital mute switches.
_________________
Regards,

NeddySeagoon

Computer users fall into two groups:-
those that do backups
those that have never had a hard drive fail.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dominique_71
Veteran
Veteran


Joined: 17 Aug 2005
Posts: 1589
Location: Switzerland (Romandie)

PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Normally, sound drivers must be build as modules. That way, it is much more easier to configure it or trace issues. If you still want them to be build into the kernel, just don't expect much help because it is not the way a linux distribution will expect the ALSA driver to work.
_________________
[[[ To any NSA and FBI agents reading that text: please consider ]]]
[[[ whether defending the US Constitution against all enemies, ]]]
[[[ foreign or domestic, requires you to follow Snowden's example. ]]]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
NeddySeagoon
Administrator
Administrator


Joined: 05 Jul 2003
Posts: 39264
Location: 56N 3W

PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dominique_71,

As you say, its much easier to debug modules and to pass parameters to loadable modules.

Built in alsa works too but trial and error with built in is harder.
Find out what works using modules, move to built in once the trial and error is complete.
_________________
Regards,

NeddySeagoon

Computer users fall into two groups:-
those that do backups
those that have never had a hard drive fail.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LIsLinuxIsSogood
Guru
Guru


Joined: 13 Feb 2016
Posts: 456

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am really confused, what is all that dmesg output that was just posted? As krinn says, there seems to be stuff missing from that file (like the beginning of dmesg.)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LIsLinuxIsSogood
Guru
Guru


Joined: 13 Feb 2016
Posts: 456

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Normally, sound drivers must be build as modules.


I think it would also help to describe more specifcally which aspects of OP's system need to be rebuilt as modules, since he has so far provided everything that is needed to be offering that information. Including a full kernel configuration, and his hardware spec.

Maybe it's at least deserves a description of the changes such as preparing the kernel rebuild, and installing the modules, etc. and then updating any grub entry.

If that makes sense, and the OP would like to attempt to do so, I think what is being suggested is to rebuild snd_hda_intel as module. Is that correct? Are there other modules as well?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
NeddySeagoon
Administrator
Administrator


Joined: 05 Jul 2003
Posts: 39264
Location: 56N 3W

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2017 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LIsLinuxIsSogood,

The provided dmesg shows only logspam from having some USB debug set.
I think its CONFIG_USB_STORAGE_DEBUG from the bulk mode transactions.

Due to all the debug entries in dmesg, the usful information is long gone.
If CONFIG_USB_STORAGE_DEBUG is on, what about CONFIG_SND_DEBUG and all the other DEBUG symbols that interfere with normal system operation?

As yet, there is insufficient information to point to a solution. All we can do is nibble away at the problem space.

Built in sound works. Its just a pain passing module parameters as they need to be on the kernel command line.
That means a reboot to test, rather than
Code:
modprobe -r <module>
modprobe <module> <parameter=value> 


I don't see a
LIsLinuxIsSogood wrote:
... Including a full kernel configuration ...
that would need to be on a pastebin.

We do know that
Code:
# CONFIG_SND_VERBOSE_PRINTK is not set
# CONFIG_SND_DEBUG is not set
are both off.
I missed that in by post above.
_________________
Regards,

NeddySeagoon

Computer users fall into two groups:-
those that do backups
those that have never had a hard drive fail.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dominique_71
Veteran
Veteran


Joined: 17 Aug 2005
Posts: 1589
Location: Switzerland (Romandie)

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2017 12:10 am    Post subject: Re: Determing the extent of the problem Reply with quote

LIsLinuxIsSogood wrote:
Here is an example of aplay command with -D, you need to modify to your hardware, based on the output you provided, I think it will be either 0,0 or 1,0 that will be the change, OK?

Code:
mplayer -ao alsa:device=hw=1.0 groovy.mp3


You can also use a asoundrc in order to set the default sound card.
_________________
[[[ To any NSA and FBI agents reading that text: please consider ]]]
[[[ whether defending the US Constitution against all enemies, ]]]
[[[ foreign or domestic, requires you to follow Snowden's example. ]]]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LIsLinuxIsSogood
Guru
Guru


Joined: 13 Feb 2016
Posts: 456

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2017 6:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, but something else curious could be switching between audio cards sounding like something simple, but probably a big part of why pulseaudio is around to help with assigning sinks to sources.

Personally I hate pulseaudio, and wish it would go away.

EDIT: By the way Tomogui have you been able to confirm the working of the hardware plugs, those should be able to play sound out of them. It may make more sense to at least start there, since in many situations the user doesn't require a very complex setup just to get sound from 1 channel or another.

ANOTHER EDIT: As others mentioned be sure to check the lspci command and match up your audio hardware to the correct kernel configuration. The mess is much better handled after reducing this aspect as others have mentioned. (My purpose was not to divert you from that goal, ever, but to help find a quicker answer for your sound card).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LIsLinuxIsSogood
Guru
Guru


Joined: 13 Feb 2016
Posts: 456

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2017 6:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dominique_71, can you please share your source for the information about sound cards and kernel modules. I just went through something similar on my desktop computer and nowhere while following the ALSA guide in the wiki does it mention what you said, about...the driver being built as a module.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dominique_71
Veteran
Veteran


Joined: 17 Aug 2005
Posts: 1589
Location: Switzerland (Romandie)

PostPosted: Sun Dec 03, 2017 12:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LIsLinuxIsSogood wrote:
Dominique_71, can you please share your source for the information about sound cards and kernel modules. I just went through something similar on my desktop computer and nowhere while following the ALSA guide in the wiki does it mention what you said, about...the driver being built as a module.


I don't remember exactly. It was said in different discussions I was part of. If I do a search, on module-parameters:
Quote:
The user can load modules with options.

which imply it is much more easier to build ALSA as modules. When you are done with it, you know it work, and you can begin to build ALSA into the kernel and pass the corresponding modules parameters to the kernel at boot. But on the long run, I would prefer to have ALSA as modules anyway because who knows what can be changed?

In alsa-driver on gentoo:

Quote:
While the ALSA guide suggests to use the in-kernel drivers for 2.6 kernels because it's simpler for the users, we had a few cases in the past where people complained about problems with ALSA due to in-kernel drivers.


That imply when the in-kernel ALSA driver works for you, that's fine. But if it doesn't work as expected, it is better to build ALSA as modules, or install the alsa-driver package.

When build as modules, you can use a /etc/modprobe.d/alsa.conf file.
_________________
[[[ To any NSA and FBI agents reading that text: please consider ]]]
[[[ whether defending the US Constitution against all enemies, ]]]
[[[ foreign or domestic, requires you to follow Snowden's example. ]]]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
krinn
Watchman
Watchman


Joined: 02 May 2003
Posts: 5966

PostPosted: Sun Dec 03, 2017 12:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LIsLinuxIsSogood wrote:
Dominique_71, can you please share your source for the information about sound cards and kernel modules. I just went through something similar on my desktop computer and nowhere while following the ALSA guide in the wiki does it mention what you said, about...the driver being built as a module.

It's also by experience:
module
- not loading something you have no use for
- loading and unloading it allowing you to load it again with parameters

And build-in
- always load the driver
- parameters could only be pass thru kernel command line (meaning rebooting).

So when troubleshooting, module is always better because of the <set parameters without rebooting>
It's then logic to hint user to use module instead of build-in when you knows parameters could be use to alter the result ; it's not specific to alsa, it could help a lot with network drivers too, but also camera...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LIsLinuxIsSogood
Guru
Guru


Joined: 13 Feb 2016
Posts: 456

PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
So when troubleshooting, module is always better because of the <set parameters without rebooting>


I agree at most 75% with this, because if I'm troubleshooting already the thing I really care least about is having to reboot. My kernel (booting from EFI) takes roughly 3 seconds to boot to my login page, and then maybe 5 seconds for me to select my session and enter my password. But even that I guess could be changed so, I sort of have to disagree that rebooting is a bad thing in this context. I guess if you are working on the modules themsleves, developing drivers or something serious like that I could see your point. I am just a typical user with basic needs, so if/when I can't get it right away I know that I am doing something wrong and the frustration that follows isn't any less when unloading, reloading, unloading, reloading the modules.

These are the reasons that I would maybe accept for why to build something as a module in the kernel:
1) Unloading it if the hardware/software is not "agreeing" - that means doing away with it (at least until the next reboot), or
2) As seems like what is being referred to here could be when trying different kernel drivers for the same hardware configuration.

I guess there is also a 3rd case which is to reduce the size of the kernel, but that seems kind of ridiculous for most users to be concerned with, since even a 20MB kernel (which seems very large to me) will fit on a disk of almost any size without hardly impacting the footprint on it,

However, in terms of ALSA it seems that the building of it as a module could actually provide one other feature, which I think could be valuable that is to stop and start the sound function on the system. But there must be another way to do that, although I'm not aware of h ow. I'm not even aware of if once the modules are unloaded the sound card is completely inaccessible.

Anyway, thanks to you both of you for the fast response, and I like what each had to say about it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LIsLinuxIsSogood
Guru
Guru


Joined: 13 Feb 2016
Posts: 456

PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
it's not specific to alsa, it could help a lot with network drivers too, but also camera...


This is probably true. But that's because if the network and camera fail, you sort of feel like hey I can't just allow this to happen when I can do something about it. The audio, I would guess most of the time people can do without it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LIsLinuxIsSogood
Guru
Guru


Joined: 13 Feb 2016
Posts: 456

PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tomogui,

Make a copy of your kernel (or kernel config) before changing it, and then go ahead with the changes offered by NeddySeagoon as well with turning on debug in the kernel. As for the extra kernel drivers that are compiled in it, the decision you need to make is about how many features at a time you will be switching on/off, and if you want to know there's basically two methods that could be enacted...in the first, you remove as much as you can and then add back what you need...this is for those who are more familiar in working with the kernel. Another method that i sometimes use is to do it in stages for removal, so that would be taking away (turning off) specific drivers that you think are not being used, and then rebooting the system...each time you will have to check to see but, as in the first method if you shut off something, you should be able to turn it back on.

I would like to retroactively retract my own suggestion that came way to soon after two other suggestions for how to handle it. If anything, what I would have offered at that time was some added help like this here in making the kernel changes. Since those are good ideas in the long haul anyway. That is to eliminate unwanted or unnecessary kernel drivers, not just because they take up space but also because they may conflict.

And for the debug suggestion as well, which is probably your best chance at getting help here in the forum. I would recommend looking back at the initial two responses you received and using them to help solve the issue.

Then as for the discussion and further questions that ensued since then...know this that there is probably a very good explanation for why this install of Gentoo and the last install differed It could have been hardware, or else software, or just the way the kernel was built (how did you build it this time?)

Be sure to read up on the configuring of your kernel in the wiki, as it will provide some good suggestions. And to make sure you do not overwrite a good kernel with one that could panic, or freeze, then the following is also good practice: make a backup of your boot partition, providing the recovery if needed, and for even quicker restoration have copies of the working kernel saved to your /home diretory.

Maybe the best thing at this point is just to post back after successfully making the changes to the kernel just, and show us that with lspci, or lspci -nnk what devices are recognized and what are the drivers in use.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic    Gentoo Forums Forum Index Multimedia All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum