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RAM on your main Gentoo box?
Less than 512MiB
2%
 2%  [ 2 ]
512MiB to less than 1GiB
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
1GiB to less than 2GiB
1%
 1%  [ 1 ]
2GiB to less than 4GiB
2%
 2%  [ 2 ]
4GiB to less than 8GiB
12%
 12%  [ 11 ]
8GiB to less than 16GiB
23%
 23%  [ 21 ]
16GiB to less than 64GiB
52%
 52%  [ 47 ]
64GiB or more
6%
 6%  [ 6 ]
Total Votes : 90

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Tony0945
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2017 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Goverp wrote:
FWIW my friend's first mainframe had 4K. Not sure how much disk, possibly none, as this was in the days of TOS.

It might not have even been semiconductor RAM! It might have been magnetic core. I remember (what a fossil!) when 256 bytes of semiconductor RAM first appeared. This was when the Univac 1108 was God.
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John R. Graham
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The IBM 370/158 I programmed on in college ca. 1978 was a two node cluster (with shared peripherals): one with 8 MiB of magnetic core and the other with 6 MiB of solid state RAM.

- John
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Tony0945
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2017 10:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John R. Graham wrote:
The IBM 370/158 I programmed on in college ca. 1978 was a two node cluster (with shared peripherals): one with 8 MiB of magnetic core and the other with 6 MiB of solid state RAM.

- John


370 didn't even exist when I went to college twelve years before you. Told you I was a fossil. I do remember punching cards on a Model 33 for the IBM 360/30
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eccerr0r
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 7:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Speaking of oddities, pfSense actually drops to mb/sec when not much traffic is going through.

So on the tables, it actually is reporting to me:
mb/sec (yes, millibits; I would hope that blocked/firewalled packets is rated in the millibits/second; also I do not have a native ipv6 uplink so I do not expect ipv6 packets to be passed upwards except as encapsulated 6 over 4 which count as ipv4 packets)
b/sec
kb/sec
Mb/sec

Fortunately it also has a hover-over that describes b/sec as bits/sec so there's no ambiguity; but it does not clarify mbit versus Mbit except that mbit is always in the "minimum" column and can be inferred to be millibits/second this way.
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Goverp
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tony0945 wrote:
[...
It might not have even been semiconductor RAM! It might have been magnetic core.
...

Indeed, 'twas magnetic core.

OK, lets see if there are any antedeluvians here:
Anyone used a machine with delay line memory?
(Not me, certainly.)
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Tony0945
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 8:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Goverp wrote:

OK, lets see if there are any antedeluvians here:
Anyone used a machine with delay line memory?
(Not me, certainly.)
Got me there!
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krinn
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

eccerr0r wrote:
mb/sec (yes, millibits; I would hope that blocked/firewalled packets is rated in the millibits/second; also I do not have a native ipv6 uplink so I do not expect ipv6 packets to be passed upwards except as encapsulated 6 over 4 which count as ipv4 packets)

Silly option, except to get bigger scale graph to see a bit coming in, but it's kinda too much, just settings the graph scale to bit would display a minimal (even hard to see) bit coming in.
And like i think, it must in fact only handle packet and not really bit going thru the network (nobody really send a raw 1 bit thru its network), it mean a minimal packet size of 64 bytes for ethernetII frame, which make minimal 512 bits, and 512bits display in a graph that have its scale base to a bit is clearly visible.
Using millibits scale, it mean the graph would hit 1000 for a bit, a byte at 8000 and a frame at 512000 (lol).
Even if not use for graph scale, it looks really wanker's option to display 8000millibits/s like it kick ass, when you have just get 1 byte.
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eccerr0r
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nah, it's because these are averages over time. pfSense wanted to make sure that you knew something got passed over that period of time. It actually marks categories that had nothing transmitted as 0.000 bytes/sec, but if one ping packet got sent over the course of a minute, that would still round down to 0; but instead it goes to millibytes/sec (instead of bytes/min or bytes/hour) to indicate something went through.
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1clue
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

eccerr0r wrote:
Nah, it's because these are averages over time. pfSense wanted to make sure that you knew something got passed over that period of time. It actually marks categories that had nothing transmitted as 0.000 bytes/sec, but if one ping packet got sent over the course of a minute, that would still round down to 0; but instead it goes to millibytes/sec (instead of bytes/min or bytes/hour) to indicate something went through.


Seems kinda silly. They could put =0 for absolutely no traffic passed, and ~0 if a very small amount of data passed.
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eccerr0r
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

However ~0 does not distinguish between 1 or 2 or even 10 unresponded SYN packets over an hour range; millibits will however, as these significant digits will get shown without changing the time base (so everything on the table is still shown as per second). I think it's reasonable - it's clear and concise versus 0.00001 bits/second.
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1clue
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

eccerr0r wrote:
However ~0 does not distinguish between 1 or 2 or even 10 unresponded SYN packets over an hour range; millibits will however, as these significant digits will get shown without changing the time base (so everything on the table is still shown as per second). I think it's reasonable - it's clear and concise versus 0.00001 bits/second.


Given enough time span, neither would millibits. The point is, no data passed or some very small amount of data passed.
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eccerr0r
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 3:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zero is significant, but the difference between 1 and 10 can be significant. Though both may round to 0, it's still one order of magnitude apart separating 1 and 10. Sure packet of 64 bytes and one packet of 65 bytes doesn't matter over a large window, but one packet versus 10 packets over a timebox can mean something.
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stephan-t
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 01, 2017 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm only have 4 GiB of RAM, but I think for compile (like bigger package as Chromium, libreoffice, Qt5) need such more ram.
Everyday usage enough this little memory size :)
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eccerr0r
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 01, 2017 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What part has issues with 4GiB RAM? I really don't think 4GiB is a small amount of RAM; maybe compared to the average in this poll it is, but it's a very usable amount of RAM.

As long as you're not using tmpfs as PORTAGE_TMPDIR I would think they should still build fine? I've seen g++ RSS exceed 300M but even on an 8 core machine, it should fit in 4GB RAM.
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John R. Graham
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 01, 2017 8:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agreed. The Chromium main app link phase barely exceeds 2 GiB of allocated RAM, which may reduce the size of the VFS cache but doesn't cause the system to thrash.

However, it isn't as if more isn't useful. For reference, on my 32 GiB, 24-core workstation (with MAKEOPTS=-j25), in the middle of a chromium emerge (at some arbitrary point):
  • 12.5 GiB used.
  • 13.9 GiB buffers / cache.
  • 6.4 GiB free.
  • 228 KiB swap used. :P
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Proinsias
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 01, 2017 9:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

8GiB RAM here.

I was using a single 4GiB stick but had to dedicate some of that to the intel graphics. With gentoo and a dual monitor set up I tried various splits but the intel graphics really needed the full 1024MiB to run smoothly when busy, and I found running gentoo with <3GiB available a little tight. With a second stick it reports 6.75GiB and all is well.
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ChalkboardHero
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 2017 6:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've got 16GB in my gentoo workstation, but I use it for general computing, NodeJS, Clojure (Euler Problems). I don't know how long I can resist the urge to have bigger numbers though.
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JackHunt
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Home machine - 16GB
Lab machine - 64GB
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tuggbuss
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2017 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laptop Lenovo 430 - 4 GiB
Intel NUC 7i7BNH - 32 GiB
Desktop home build - 64 GiB
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rosomak
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 23, 2017 8:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jaglover wrote:
I've always wondered why people buy excess RAM.


1. Usually they don't. The devil is in the use of the word: "excess". Haven't you meant: "I've always wondered why people buy RAM which in my opinion they do not need"?
2. The mechanism works like this:
A) Buying SSD
B) Bye bye swap
C) Hmmm ... what about /tmp (and sometimes /var/tmp) ? Let's see what wiki/gentoo says.
D) Oh, problem of compiling because of lack of space ...
E) How much RAM do I really need? How much money will it cost? Optimal amount - from my point of view - is ...
3. I had 4 or 8 on my HDD laptops. Probably still would. I have 24 on my SSD laptop. I don't think I'm not typical with my view.

PS to D: Seriously. It so happened, that I had to do "zero option" recently. CD from september, stage3 from October, and gcc had to be upgraded to 6. 12GiB was not enough. Obviously I don't have 16GiB (tempfs) or more on day-to-day basis, but I can recall four or five times, when I saw that lack_of_space_error during update. Gentoo: ~amd64 / KDE5.

And, You know, I really love Gentoo, I've had it since 2005 or 2006, after an affair with Debian and a really long relationship with Slack, but it is mature marriage. These days of long, hot nights are, unfortunately, over. :-)
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