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Hollywood: Nothing is unfilmable if you rewrite it.
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pjp
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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2013 12:03 am    Post subject: Hollywood: Nothing is unfilmable if you rewrite it. Reply with quote

'Unfilmable' novels? No such thing, says Hollywood
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Hollywood took the tragic ending of "The Natural" and turned it into a scene of feel-good fireworks. Who, besides a bunch of hubris-fascinated English majors, wants to see the book's (spoiler!) fallen, weeping Roy Hobbs "excluded from the game and all his records forever destroyed"? [...]

"The Grapes of Wrath" eliminated a symbolic suckling scene, toned down the politics, changed the ending and became a classic. [...]

And, not unimportantly, [having] marketing muscle. [...]

"They're not going to care too much about whether this is a well-done adaptation," she adds. "They're going to care about whether it's a Hollywood blockbuster."

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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2013 2:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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He even has a reason for using rock and hip-hop music on his soundtrack: The seemingly anachronistic sounds are the equivalent of jazz in the novel's 1922 setting, when the music was "referred to as an African-American fad," the director told The New York Times.
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"As I watched the trailer, I thought, 'This is for 16-year-olds,' " she says. "All of this is about gearing this toward high school and college students who may not have any notion of who Fitzgerald was or what the book actually was.


I was thinking about seeing this. I guess I'll wait for it to show up on my tablet.
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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2013 3:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I didn't realize that they got rid of the "suckling" scene in the movie of Grapes of Wrath. I kinda felt like the book was all just buildup to that event.
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sikpuppy
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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2013 5:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's made by Baz Luhrmann, so unless you are gay or a tweenager it will also be unwatchable.
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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2013 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

richk449 wrote:
I didn't realize that they got rid of the "suckling" scene in the movie of Grapes of Wrath. I kinda felt like the book was all just buildup to that event.

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The case of the picture of a young woman with a torn dress on and a baby sucking at her breast is even stranger. She is called ''Rose of Sharon, 1938.'' Rosasharn, in Steinbeck's Oklahoma dialect, was the character who at the end of the novel tried to save a starving old man by offering him her breast. When ''The Grapes of Wrath'' came out, Mr. Bristol was disturbed by Rosasharn's breast scene. ''I spoke to Steinbeck and said I wish he hadn't done it that way, because it didn't happen that way,'' Mr. Bristol said. ''It wasn't an old man, it was a baby'' at the woman's breast. Steinbeck was ''annoyed with the criticism,'' Mr. Bristol said. ''He didn't take criticism very well.''

http://www.nytimes.com/1996/11/01/movies/where-fact-and-fiction-intertwine.html
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 1:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BoneKracker wrote:
richk449 wrote:
I didn't realize that they got rid of the "suckling" scene in the movie of Grapes of Wrath. I kinda felt like the book was all just buildup to that event.

Quote:
The case of the picture of a young woman with a torn dress on and a baby sucking at her breast is even stranger. She is called ''Rose of Sharon, 1938.'' Rosasharn, in Steinbeck's Oklahoma dialect, was the character who at the end of the novel tried to save a starving old man by offering him her breast. When ''The Grapes of Wrath'' came out, Mr. Bristol was disturbed by Rosasharn's breast scene. ''I spoke to Steinbeck and said I wish he hadn't done it that way, because it didn't happen that way,'' Mr. Bristol said. ''It wasn't an old man, it was a baby'' at the woman's breast. Steinbeck was ''annoyed with the criticism,'' Mr. Bristol said. ''He didn't take criticism very well.''

http://www.nytimes.com/1996/11/01/movies/where-fact-and-fiction-intertwine.html

Fascinating. I didn't know any of that back-story. I am sucker for Steinbeck too, although not GoW so much.
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 2:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's some more back story for you. The phrase "Grapes of Wrath", suggested by Steinbeck's wife at the time, was known to her because of it's presence in The Battle Hymn of the Republic. That song was derived from a marching song some Civil War troops had made up based on a unit meme that originated with them harassing a fellow soldier because he was somewhat hapless and an immigrant.

The soldier was a Scotsman by the name of Brown, so they would tease him about being a disgrace to John Brown (who had martyred himself in the Abolitionist cause, serving as one of the triggers of the outbreak of hostilities). This became generalized as a meme.

It became fashionable in the unit to half-sarcastically chide each other with comparisons to John Brown (e.g., "Look at your boots! Have you no pride, man, while John Brown lies mouldering in his grave!"). I suspect they may have been mocking one of their officers, but I have never read this anywhere. Several ditties along these lines emerged, and some were attached to a regionally popular campfire song of the time. This was taken up by some of the ballsier noncoms, minus some negativity, references to genitalia, niggers, etc., who, knowing the troops' familiarity with and affection for the tune, used it as a marching cadence, which then spread throughout the regiment.

One day this rich bitch banker's daughter (who was also a poet) from Boston, who was in D.C. because her rich Boston doctor husband wanted to watch the troops marching off to war (as a guest of the President), heard this unit march by, proudly singing this catchy if somewhat earthy tune about John Brown's Body -- that he died to make men free, and he lies mouldering in his grave, but his soul is marching on!" -- and she wrote a substantially cleaned-up version, making it about the glory of God and not the worms happily eating John Brown's body and so on, and adding a whole lot of virtuous scripture references (including a bit about the "Grapes of Wrath"), and she published it.
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 3:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2013/may/11/literary-novels-film-directors-adapt
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When the Cannes film festival starts next week, William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, adapted and directed by James Franco, will be in the lineup. The Spider-Man star is known for mixing bookish projects with acting in blockbusters, but has nevertheless raised eyebrows by selecting a novel with 15 narrators that tells the seemingly uncinegenic story of a southern matriarch's death and burial.

This month will also see Paul Thomas Anderson begin to shoot his version of Thomas Pynchon's Inherent Vice, the first of Pynchon's dauntingly complex works to be filmed; and Steven Soderbergh recently announced plans for a 12-hour TV dramatisation of John Barth's The Sot-Weed Factor ("If it works, it'll be super-cool. And if it doesn't, you won't be able to watch 10 minutes of it"), a rambling 750-page novel with an ill-advised title about an English poet in 17th-century Maryland.

Something is clearly changing, at least for adventurous auteurs, raising the question of whether any books still remain off-limits.
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