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odeSolver
Tux's lil' helper
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Joined: 11 Jul 2010
Posts: 84
Location: NJ, USA

PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2013 9:01 pm    Post subject: How do I let my advisor see everything? Reply with quote

Hi. I need a simple command (or simple instructions) which will let me set everything in my directory and sub-directories so that my advisor (or anyone) can read and use them for all time.

My advisor is the owner of the system, but he is not a Linux-jockey (neither am I). Everything I do on the system is for his research. There is no reason for me to hide anything on it from him. I upload many big files for him all the time, but he can't see them in my directory. So then I have to copy them to some other directory (specifically, /data/myinitials) and then I still have to change the protections on them using these commands

Code:
scp newfiles...
cp newfiles /data/myinitials
cd /data/myinitials
chmod u+rwx *
chmod g+rwx *
chmod o+rwx *


OK, now I know that is not the most difficult or time consuming thing in the world. But after long uploads, sometimes I forget to copy and chmod. And naturally, I tell him the files are there for him but, of course, he can't get them.

So I want to make this even easier. Can I just give him access to everything in my directory and everything new that is copied to it? How about the directory /data/myinitials? Can I give him free reign over anything in there? How?

Thanks.
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NeddySeagoon
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Joined: 05 Jul 2003
Posts: 31912
Location: 56N 3W

PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2013 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

odeSolver,

What are the permissions on /data/myinitials now?

The simple way is to make a group that gives anyone you want, read access. then make the dir and files have that group.
There is no need to give the group write access, if they want to change files, they can make their own copies.

On Gentoo, there is often a group called users that all users belong to.
You need to be root to create and allocate a group.
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NeddySeagoon

Computer users fall into two groups:-
those that do backups
those that have never had a hard drive fail.
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odeSolver
Tux's lil' helper
Tux's lil' helper


Joined: 11 Jul 2010
Posts: 84
Location: NJ, USA

PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2013 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NeddySeagoon wrote:
odeSolver,

What are the permissions on /data/myinitials now?

Here are the current privileges:
Code:
$ cd /data
$ ls
drwxrwxr-x.  2 myuname  myuname   4096 Mar 31 16:46 myinitials/



NeddySeagoon wrote:
The simple way is to make a group that gives anyone you want, read access. then make the dir and files have that group.
There is no need to give the group write access, if they want to change files, they can make their own copies.

On Gentoo, there is often a group called users that all users belong to.
You need to be root to create and allocate a group.

I don't have admin privileges. My advisor (the admin) doesn't want to be bothered with this type of thing (he just wants to do math). I'm more of the tinkerer.
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NeddySeagoon
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Joined: 05 Jul 2003
Posts: 31912
Location: 56N 3W

PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

odeSolver,

As you own the directory, you can change the group access too.

As a user, you can read /etc/group to see if there is a suitable group on the system already.
If there is, its likely to be called users and all normal users will be members.

Code:
chgrp users myuname
chmod 755 myuname
will give users read access to myuname.

You will need to apply the group and permissions change to the files already there too.
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NeddySeagoon

Computer users fall into two groups:-
those that do backups
those that have never had a hard drive fail.
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dataking
Apprentice
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Joined: 20 Apr 2005
Posts: 156

PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NeddySeagoon wrote:
odeSolver,

As you own the directory, you can change the group access too.

As a user, you can read /etc/group to see if there is a suitable group on the system already.
If there is, its likely to be called users and all normal users will be members.

Code:
chgrp users myuname
chmod 755 myuname
will give users read access to myuname.

You will need to apply the group and permissions change to the files already there too.


Code:
chgrp -R users myuname
should suffice for existing files/directories.
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