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gerard82
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 11:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi ITAFurla,
4 primary partitions is the maximum.
So you'll have to use one of the existing partitions to make extended.
This is a tough one.Your "C" partition is probably the largest and should be divided
to make room for Linux.
The recovery partition will be needed in case your Windows conks out.
I really woulddn't know what to do here.
Gerard.
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ITAFurla
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

just bought I used the HP recovery manager to make the recovery DVDs (3).
I wonder if the dvds work alone (probably, due the size) or need the recovery partition (my old pc with XP used to).

can somebody confirm?
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ITAFurla
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thank you for the answer, we were writing at the same time...
c: can be dived with the Seven's utility and it was on my plans..



EDIT: I solved deleting the recovery partition.
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Last edited by ITAFurla on Wed Dec 30, 2009 12:42 pm; edited 1 time in total
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desultory
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Merged the preceding four posts.
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Tom_
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 2009 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I intend to add a new ReiserFS / ReiserFS4 partition to my system (single ext4 rootfs for the moment) because I heard it was worthwhile to use it for small files (like the ebuilds composing the Portage tree).

On this partition, i'll store :
- official Portage tree
- overlays

What else can i store on it ? Which kind of files can make profit of ReiserFS ?

For example, is it worthwhile to store ccache cache on this partition?

Thank you!
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Mike Hunt
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 02, 2010 8:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many things like the /usr/portage, /tmp, /var/tmp, /boot, directories don't really need journaling.
I use ext2 for those.

/usr/portage is fine with small blocks and plenty of inodes because most of it is zillions of very small files.
On the other hand /usr/portage/distfiles contains mostly rather large files, so large blocks is better there.
So splitting those is one thing some do.
Otherwise a good compromise is formatting with the default block size and number of inodes is usually best.
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cwr
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2010 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of the things which sometimes bites people installing Gentoo for the first
time is running out of inodes on /usr/portage; the partition looks as if it has
spare space, yet won't accept more files. It usually takes a question here to
find out that inodes are a separate resource.

I don't know it the problem is highlighted in the current documentation - it
wasn't when I last checked, long ago - but a warning might be worth adding
to the install instructions. I generally use the mkfs -T news flag on the
portage partition regardless.

Will
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CaptainHero
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2010 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok, so I'm down to reinstalling Gentoo to change my partition scheme and cutting off some space from Windows cause I hardly ever boot it.

I have been reading through this thread and several questions came to my mind:

Mike Hunt wrote:

Quote:
/usr/portage is fine with small blocks and plenty of inodes because most of it is zillions of very small files.
On the other hand /usr/portage/distfiles contains mostly rather large files, so large blocks is better there.
So splitting those is one thing some do.


1) So would it be a good idea to go for /usr/portage with ext2 -T news or rather small?

Code:
/etc/mke2fs.conf

...
}
        news = {
                inode_ratio = 4096
        }
...
 }
        small = {
                blocksize = 1024
                inode_size = 128
                inode_ratio = 4096
        }
...


2) What would be a good option for /usr/portage/distfiles?

3) Am I right that primary/extended/logical partitions dont matter for /boot and swap these days? I'm gonna stick with grub legacy if it matters.

4) I am gonna compile OpenOffice, so I'll need from 6 to 10 GB (posts differ) for /var/temp/portage. Should I make the entire /var a 6-10 Gb partition or make it smaller and go for a seperate /var/temp/portage?
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Mike Hunt
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 4:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a suggestion, one way to create an ext2 filesystem that will be used for many small files could be done like this:
Code:
mke2fs -b 1024 -N 200000 /mnt/gentoo/usr/portage


and one way to create an ext2 filesystem that will be used for large files could be done like this:
Code:
mke2fs -b 4096 -T largefile /mnt/gentoo/usr/portage/distfiles


It doesn't really matter whether /boot and swap are on primary or logical partitions.

/var/tmp/portage is where building occurs by default, so a separate partition might be a very good idea, a default ext2 would be fine there.

Adjust to taste, have fun. :)
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cwr
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 12:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd be inclined to just use separate partitions for /, /boot, /home, /var, and /usr/portage
(and /tmp?); there doesn't seem any reason to make things more complicated. If you
suddenly need more space on /var/tmp, just mount a scratch partition there as a
temporary measure.

With really large partitions (>32G) it might be worth using ext4, simply because the fsck
checks on boot are a lot quicker.

One useful trick is to have a separate / partition that boots to a shell, which can be used
for maintenance; it's quicker than booting from eg: a rescue CD.

Will
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firmis132
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cool
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CaptainHero
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@ MikeHunt

Thanks for the suggestions, I have got it all set up now, running fine.
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Mike Hunt
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 10:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice, you're welcome. :)
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BlueRain
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What is generally a good size for root? Right now, I have 15GB of / but questioning if I should add more. Although it's occupying < 8 GB of space out of 15GB, I'm wondering if adding more disk space is somewhat better? I don't think there's any other programs I will add besides this either. Although, I might; I never know.
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aCOSwt
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BlueRain wrote:
What is generally a good size for root?

It merely depends on the other partitions you will implement.
Will you have a separate partition for /usr , /var , /tmp... ?
Or will you get everything pushed under root ?
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BlueRain
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

aCOSwt wrote:
BlueRain wrote:
What is generally a good size for root?

It merely depends on the other partitions you will implement.
Will you have a separate partition for /usr , /var , /tmp... ?
Or will you get everything pushed under root ?


That is quite interesting actually. I've always thought of implementing a separate partition for them. Often though with my format, I had the bare essential: /boot / swap and /home.

My /boot at 75MB
swap 512MB
/ 15GB
/home rest

I have 230GB HD. I may possibly add another HD later on but not at this minute. I'd like to test out separate partitions though. Sounds like something I could give it a try. :)
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aCOSwt
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

- If you put the content of /usr /opt /var /tmp on (an)other partition(s) than root, then 256M is more than enough for root for standard run time.
512M is comfortable when installing if you put your distribution tarballs on it.
- If it is for experimenting then play as you wish with all this. Possible configurations are numerous (simply read this thread... 8O) and nobody is actually wrong. Nobody is perfectly right either... :D
- If is is for having quickly a trouble free general purpose running platform then opt for the Gentoo's handbook's advice.
- If you have precise dedicated needs or contingencies, expose them here.
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BlueRain
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

aCOSwt wrote:
- If you put the content of /usr /opt /var /tmp on (an)other partition(s) than root, then 256M is more than enough for root for standard run time.
512M is comfortable when installing if you put your distribution tarballs on it.
- If it is for experimenting then play as you wish with all this. Possible configurations are numerous (simply read this thread... 8O) and nobody is actually wrong. Nobody is perfectly right either... :D
- If is is for having quickly a trouble free general purpose running platform then opt for the Gentoo's handbook's advice.
- If you have precise dedicated needs or contingencies, expose them here.


What may be the possible advantages of separating the partitions? I did read that some people had the opportunity of keeping /var separate and never had to worry about their computer freezing up on them or halting. I've always kept my computer configuration at quite the default with /home on a separate partition from the rest. I do lump everything in / for all my configurations and distfiles and so on.

But okay, let me set aside those questions from here because I think I'm getting off point. If I do separate /usr and /var, should I keep /usr at maybe even 10-15GB?

In the end though, I might play around with these settings in Virtualbox instead of my main box as setting the configuration a bit complex for me right now. I'd have to see everything and change things around as I work through them before I do anything to my main box. But then again, nothings wrong with simplicity either. lol :)
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maevil
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2010 9:41 pm    Post subject: Looking for advice for partioning my system Reply with quote

Hello, i want to install my system on a new hd, an ssd.I've read the wiki here i have some doubts and would like to ask to you what you think.

Well let me introduce that i'm going to use an ssd for my system and another hd for data storage.
My first thought was to put / on ssd and /home on the other one.On the wiki i saw they suggest the same thing apart from the fact that there its suggested to put /var /usr /tmp on different partitions, is it worth that?Because i'm thinking about the fact that with and ssd i will benefice having a bigger partition.

Also i've seen about using tmpfs but only have 2gb of ram, would it be a good idea?if so do i need the /tmp to be into the ssd?looking at it but i'm not sure on how it works tbh.
So basically i'd like to know from you what you think about partioning using an ssd and an hd and if i should give tmpfs a try :)

Thanks for every reply :)
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desultory
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2010 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Merged the preceding post.
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xiaweitang
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 9:26 pm    Post subject: [SOLVED]which directory need mounted as primary paritions? Reply with quote

Just installed Gentoo to my laptop following the handbook partition scheme /boot, / and swap. I'm planning to install Gentoo to my desktop, too. This time I want to use more partitions, e.g. /boot, /, /home, /usr, /var, swap. We are allowed to have no more than 4 primary partitions. My questions is which directories must be mounted into primary partitions?

Last edited by xiaweitang on Sat Mar 06, 2010 5:04 am; edited 2 times in total
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aCOSwt
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are'nt there hundreds of possible solutions discussed there : http://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic-t-420242.html ?
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Raistlin Majere
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
My questions is which directories must be mounted into primary partitions?


none , you can make 1 extended partion and use that . my laptop was already using three partions for windows7 and recovery when i bought it, i just made 1 extended partition for gentoo and then split that into my swap, /boot , /, /home.
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NathanZachary
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 10:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Simple answer is that you could have them all as logical partitions if you so desired. However, having your /boot as a primary partition is recommended as it will help if you run into problems and need to recover.
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NeddySeagoon
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

xiaweitang,

The only rule is that the files needed to boot must be readable by the BIOS.
IF your BIOS can read the entire drive, there are no partition constraints.

If your HDD is larger than the BIOS can read, you must arrange for the boot files to be in the BIOS readable area.
Traditionally, this has been done with a small /boot partition at the start of the disk but it need not be.
This problem first occurred when drives reached about 530Mb
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