Gentoo Forums
Gentoo Forums
Gentoo Forums
Quick Search: in
Best/Favorite coding program
View unanswered posts
View posts from last 24 hours

Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next  
Reply to topic    Gentoo Forums Forum Index Portage & Programming
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
The Doctor
Veteran
Veteran


Joined: 27 Jul 2010
Posts: 1510

PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2013 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
kdevelop is pretty nice. The down side of having to put all that KDE crap on your system outweighs the benefits, though
Just my 2 cents here, but if you are complaining about the weight of kdevelop, that is a bit of a non-issue. kdevelop only requires about 11 kde packages, including oxygen-icons, konsole, and knotify (which I believe can be eliminated by using a different package to satisfy the virtual.) Conversely, netbeans pulls in about 128 new packages on my system, mostly having to do with java. Personally, I think it is silly to complain a bout a dep just because it has random "k"s or "g"s thrown in. Its not like you use them when the program is not running. All told, I would say its the lightest of the 3 IDEs put forth here (except probably code::blocks or Anjuta). Its only bloat if you don't use it. If its a tool that does what you need its an essential feature.

Posted from openbox+ tint2 desktop with no kde in sight.
_________________
First things first, but not necessarily in that order.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DaggyStyle
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 22 Mar 2006
Posts: 4956

PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2013 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

codelite is no that bad too.
_________________
Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity and I'm not sure about the former - Albert Einstein
ProjectFootball
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sinisterdomestik
l33t
l33t


Joined: 28 Aug 2003
Posts: 683
Location: Texas

PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dalu wrote:
code:blocks is nice for c++


I just started looking at this one, after seeing it mentioned once or twice here. I like the look of it, might give it a try.

So far, I've emerged gvim, geany, and will try code::blocks tonight when I get home from work.

Thanks for all the great suggestions/input that was given. Hopefully, I will like one of these enough to use it full time. At the moment, just from looks without being able to try them out much, I think Geany and/or Code::Blocks(after I emerge it) might be the one(s) I use the most.

Thanks again guys, ya'll have been a great help!!
_________________
Thou shalt NEVER speak of removing thine Linux
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
blain3
n00b
n00b


Joined: 02 Dec 2012
Posts: 30
Location: Southern Pensylvania

PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The main reason i use geany is for bash scripting, although i believe it supports other languages. I like it because it is just a box, with numbered lines going down, i write my script, save it and test it in the terminal at the bottom of the program(one of the tabs down there). Very lightweight.. pulled in maybe 1 or 2 deps in xfce? if that. As for Vi.. it was written by one of the lead programmers at Berkely when they rewrote AT&T's Unix and used as an editor, its been modified and changed since then of course, we now have Vim, and Gvim. If your willing to learn it, its capable of more then you think, i have a book on vi/vim and its just on editing, about 3 inches thick. As for choosing an editor, the best advice i can give is to use something you'r comfurtable with as you dont need some giant program to write a single language, this isnt microsoft guys. There are plenty of editors out there that you can add support for programming language color bracketing etc. You save the file, use your compiler. Just my oppinion as i said. I use geany for bash, vim for editing files. Thats just me though, and I've been talked into looking into emacs but have yet to try it.
Note: if you do look into vi/vim make sure to at least read up on it a bit. saving, quiting, quiting without saving etc.. well its much different. As in there are two different "modes". Insert ( where you edit ) and command mode. Look into this if you've never used either.. especially vi in terminal.. its quite... well if you take that route you'll see.
_________________
#uname -s -m -i -p -v -o -n
Linux
x86_64
GenuineIntel
Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-3630QM CPU @ 2.40GHz
#1 SMP PREEMPT Mon Nov 19 11:17:39 UTC 2012
GNU/Linux
xobtihs
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dol-sen
Developer
Developer


Joined: 30 Jun 2002
Posts: 2569
Location: Richmond, BC, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 2:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I used scite for years, but this last year have moved to mostly using geany. I really like it. It does all kinds of different languages. I use it for python mostly. I like that it lists all functions, classes, variables in the file in the left side notebook, they are clickable to use as bookmarks, bringing you to that location. Great for larger files. It has some built-in capabilities for compiling, etc.. As stated it doesn't do everything, but does do the most common actions, it even can be config's for a coupler custom commands under the "Build" menu. It also has configurable tab completion macros that I've been adding to for my coding. They're handy for laying out a basic new function or class, etc. just a few keystrokes and it does a bunch and places the cursor right where it needs to be to start filling in details, like class name, parameters,... Another very handy feature, is grep search output lines in the bottom window are clickable to open the file and put you at that location in the file, ready to edit, search & replace operations can span multiple files (manually selecting the next file).

Overall a solid editor for development.
_________________
Brian
Porthole, the Portage GUI frontend irc@freenode: #gentoo-guis, #porthole, Blog
layman, gentoolkit, CoreBuilder, esearch...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sinisterdomestik
l33t
l33t


Joined: 28 Aug 2003
Posts: 683
Location: Texas

PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 2:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now let's say, solely for the sake of argument, and not because I really don't know, if I were to stick with Geany, that would be just fine if I wanted to build some 3d type program?

This may sound like a dumb question.....well, it is, so let's just call it what it is :)

My assumptions are that, yes, Geany (and probably any other editor) would be fully capable of doing things like 3d games, etc, with the right knowledge, but it doesn't hurt to be 100% sure.
_________________
Thou shalt NEVER speak of removing thine Linux
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hypnos
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 18 Jul 2002
Posts: 2868
Location: Omnipresent

PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 3:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any code editor is suitable for any coding project. You can write the same ASCII code in sed or in Visual Studio.

You have to decide what features make one code editor better than another for your personal style and the demands of the project.

I happen to use geany because it has code indexing w/ symbol suggestions, code folding and replete syntax highlighting, while not being too large or having too many compile-time dependencies. It helps that I use XFCE, so everything else is GTK+ to begin with.

If you are writing C++ code exclusively for KDE, maybe KDevelop would be more useful to you. You have to investigate and decide.
_________________
Personal overlay | Simple backup scheme
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
blain3
n00b
n00b


Joined: 02 Dec 2012
Posts: 30
Location: Southern Pensylvania

PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 4:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For the sake of argument, I refrained from boasting more on geany in my last post in that i personally am not advanced enough to use it for those purposes. Yet I would go as far as to say that the geany I currently use with xfce seems to me, and sorry if i tend to think quite broad, but say your working on a project. This project has numerous other smaller pieces of programing code, etc etc. Geany uses tabs. I cant say off the top of my head how many it maxes out at, but either way, multiple instances running on several workstations? Seems to me you could build quite an enormous project and be able to reference its pieces quite easily (This is just but one thought off the top of my head). Easy to discern line numbers, (bracket / coloring helps me quite a bit). For a simple design geany really pulls its own for many reasons, and I'm very new to programing and Linux in general. Now I'm currently learning some basic bash scripting / editing / programing, and I use geany and vim. Vim more so for things like /etc/fstab, /boot/grub/grub.conf... etc etc. Geany I've found is very nice for such things as writing .conkyrc, writing scripts, simple programing. Now when I move on to python or C, I'll be pretty comfortable using these programs, so will I have to find some new, strange program to write code? of course not. Between these two programs I have support for just about every major language being used today. Personally, this is what works for me, I like that I'll likely not have to learn another editor for a long time, if at all. As for what was said about using kde, I would suggest using something like [ #emerge -pv geany ] and see exactly what use flags it listens to. Its quite possible you could compile it with kde,gnome,gtk,python,ruby.. support. I'd check but I'm on my windows machine =(.
_________________
#uname -s -m -i -p -v -o -n
Linux
x86_64
GenuineIntel
Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-3630QM CPU @ 2.40GHz
#1 SMP PREEMPT Mon Nov 19 11:17:39 UTC 2012
GNU/Linux
xobtihs
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sinisterdomestik
l33t
l33t


Joined: 28 Aug 2003
Posts: 683
Location: Texas

PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 5:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hypnos wrote:
Any code editor is suitable for any coding project.


This is exactly what I thought, but again, just wanted to make sure as I haven't used Gentoo, much less Linux, in upwards of 5 years. I have messed around with Geany a little bit, and so far, I like, and always have, the color coding and especially the line numbers and section minimizers(?).

I think that I will stick with Geany and vim, at least until I get more knowledgeable in coding and back into the swing of things.

Again, I thank all of you for all the suggestions, tips and thoughts on the matter. They have been a great help to someone wanting to get back into coding, and as always, you guys have been nothing but nice and helpful.

Thank you so much!!
_________________
Thou shalt NEVER speak of removing thine Linux
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ppurka
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 26 Dec 2004
Posts: 3209

PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LoTeK wrote:
I've tried gvim too, but I've decided that I want either a "real" GUI/IDE or a minimalistic terminal environment (and the minimalistic styles won), but maybe BK would say that this is because I sometimes tend to be a 01-black/white extremist :)
Using gvim gives one a little bit more control over the mouse and some things like Ctrl-h, Ctrl-s can be actually used and bound to something. And it need not look "bloated". For example this.
_________________
emerge --quiet redefined | E17 vids: I, II | Now using kde4 :-/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dr.Willy
Guru
Guru


Joined: 15 Jul 2007
Posts: 352
Location: NRW, Germany

PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LoTeK wrote:
I recently discovered the book: practical vim: edit text at the speed of thought

…and then people realise how slow that can be at times.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
blain3
n00b
n00b


Joined: 02 Dec 2012
Posts: 30
Location: Southern Pensylvania

PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 2:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dr.Willy wrote:
LoTeK wrote:
I recently discovered the book: practical vim: edit text at the speed of thought

…and then people realise how slow that can be at times.


I've got O'REILLY Vi and Vim as a reference. Let me tell you, using Vim, and even sometimes Vi, from a GUI inside a terminal isn't so bad. insert and escape, :wq :q :!q .. you know the drill. I loaded up Vi in a TTY one day a while back, and my arrow buttons didn't work. The commands were all completely alien and I sat there dumbfounded. The book covers the usage, commands etc.. no coding just reference and editing. It's almost 500 pages. I had, however, wrote an essay on the programmers from Berkley in the 70's who created Berkley Unix (BSD). So i was pretty humbled thinking about those guys not only using Vi but writing it as well, AND rewriting AT&T's Unix with but a dozen core programmers. When I grew up, I at least had dos, DOOM, and I look at that like its ancient. Think how programming was back then, and consider they were even back then using arpanet or whatever networks. So I'd say if your young and learning things now, .. even myself, Just remember how good we have it that you have 10 editors to choose from =)
_________________
#uname -s -m -i -p -v -o -n
Linux
x86_64
GenuineIntel
Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-3630QM CPU @ 2.40GHz
#1 SMP PREEMPT Mon Nov 19 11:17:39 UTC 2012
GNU/Linux
xobtihs
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LoTeK
Apprentice
Apprentice


Joined: 26 Jul 2012
Posts: 270

PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 7:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ppurka wrote:
LoTeK wrote:
I've tried gvim too, but I've decided that I want either a "real" GUI/IDE or a minimalistic terminal environment (and the minimalistic styles won), but maybe BK would say that this is because I sometimes tend to be a 01-black/white extremist :)
Using gvim gives one a little bit more control over the mouse and some things like Ctrl-h, Ctrl-s can be actually used and bound to something. And it need not look "bloated". For example this.


Well I have to admit this looks good, is this your configuration? can you post your .vimrc? (or is there another configuration file with gvim?). If I'm able to remove even those "close,minimize" - icons at the top I'll give it a try...

Quote:
…and then people realise how slow that can be at times.

hehe yes, so you think it's better if you can accuse your editor for beeing slow ?! :)

Quote:
So i was pretty humbled thinking about those guys not only using Vi but writing it as well, AND rewriting AT&T's Unix with but a dozen core programmers.

Sometimes I think they were in a better position then we are. I mean I rather want to code Vi then some flirt applications for teenager :D
_________________
"I want to see gamma rays! I want to hear X-rays! Do you see the absurdity of what I am? I can't even express these things properly because I have to conceptualize complex ideas in this stupid limiting spoken language!"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ppurka
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 26 Dec 2004
Posts: 3209

PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The close, minimize are from the window manager. So, you can turn off borders in your window manager for gvim windows.

I use a bunch of plugins and a customized pyte colortheme. So, appearance wise you would get something close to the pic I posted above if you use pyte. Here is my vimrc: http://dpaste.com/hold/900198/
_________________
emerge --quiet redefined | E17 vids: I, II | Now using kde4 :-/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Yamakuzure
Veteran
Veteran


Joined: 21 Jun 2006
Posts: 1442
Location: Bardowick, Germany

PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2013 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As most of the thread is a [g]vim discussion, I thought I throw my 2 cents about something different in. ;)

I am using the following IDEs/Tools for different purposes:
  1. (C/C++) Code::Blocks
    This is a great cross-platform IDE that I use for pure C/C++ projects that
    • Can live with a single (or no) Makefile,
    • have to be edited/compiled on different platforms (including Windows) and/or
    • need direct and IDE-driven GDB/Valgrind support.
    A nice feature is the integration of a lot of tools like astyle or cppcheck.
    Code::Blocks, on the other hand, has some problems with projects that scatter their sources over subdirectories using local Makefiles. (Generally Autotools projects.)
  2. (C/C++) Eclipse CDT with Autotools support.
    This is really great. It does not only analyzes your code and points at fishy parts before a compiler has its say, but it knows some useful stuff like AutoConf and AutoMake syntax. And it has help for autotools included, so you get a full description of, let's say, AC_PROG_CC_C99 just by hovering the mouse over it.
    On the other hand Eclipse CDT has a nasty issue: It does not list static functions in its outline view. As non-static functions are listed there, this can be really confusing.
  3. (Perl / Bash) Eclipse E-P-I-C and ShellEd
    Projects, that consist of Perl and/or Bash parts are done with Eclipse here, simply because they can be easily handled. E-P-I-C is the best Perl-IDE I have found so far. It features Perl::Critic and Module::Starter integration. Both are very handy.
    Downside here: It's Eclipse, it's big. So normally, for Perl and Bash I use:
  4. Kate
    Unfortunately Kate (KDE Advanced Text Editor) is highly underrated. Most people do not realize that it can be turned into a very convenient IDE with its addons. It is a lot faster than Code::Blocks or Eclipse (of course!) and I use it for everything that does not need a big scale project management environment.
    You can have console support, enable VI-mode if you want, have spell checking, source support for an insanely high amount of languages (Matlab anyone? Verilog? Scala? Zonnon?) and much more add-ons.
  5. (qt4/qt5) qt-creator
    There is simply no better GUI form editor anywhere. qt-creator is IMHO even better than the old Delphi 5 Builder, and that means something. So whenever a qt-project is on my plate, I use qt-creator for the creation and editing of the forms.
    On the other hand, the programming is done useing Code::Blocks then. ;)

_________________
systemd - The biggest fallacies
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mimosinnet
Guru
Guru


Joined: 10 Aug 2006
Posts: 525
Location: Barcelona, Spain

PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 1:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have started coding in Perl, and I have found the "perl-support" vim plugin really useful.
_________________
Please add [solved] to the initial post's subject line if you feel your problem is resolved.
Thank the community answering other people's post, specially those unanswered.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rmzelnick
n00b
n00b


Joined: 03 Feb 2013
Posts: 24

PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 1:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Codeblocks very good for beginners.
Please also note that there is also a vim plugin for eclipse (but its not that cool)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dr.Willy
Guru
Guru


Joined: 15 Jul 2007
Posts: 352
Location: NRW, Germany

PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rmzelnick wrote:
Please also note that there is also a vim plugin for eclipse

Interestingly there is also an eclipse plugin for vim ;)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Yamakuzure
Veteran
Veteran


Joined: 21 Jun 2006
Posts: 1442
Location: Bardowick, Germany

PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2013 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

btw.: Having an IDE that suits your needs (And it does not matter whether "IDE" means a full scale GUI driven system like Eclipse, or a console based system like vim+ctags or emacs) is only one half. The other is understanding The seven reasons why you are a slow programmer! ;)

Oh, and don't forget to read and memorize How to write unmaintainable code, it's a real win! :D
_________________
systemd - The biggest fallacies
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sinisterdomestik
l33t
l33t


Joined: 28 Aug 2003
Posts: 683
Location: Texas

PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 12:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yamakuzure wrote:
btw.: Having an IDE that suits your needs (And it does not matter whether "IDE" means a full scale GUI driven system like Eclipse, or a console based system like vim+ctags or emacs) is only one half. The other is understanding The seven reasons why you are a slow programmer! ;)

Oh, and don't forget to read and memorize How to write unmaintainable code, it's a real win! :D

HAHA those are great! I was only able to skim through the unmaintainable code, but it looked funny as hell so far! Will definitely be reading that one later.
_________________
Thou shalt NEVER speak of removing thine Linux
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Kiwon Um
n00b
n00b


Joined: 15 Jul 2009
Posts: 49

PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2013 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My case...

For source code edit: emacs
For build system: scons, autotools, cmake or make
For debug: gdb
For proof of concept: freemind
For software architecture design: umlet (external) or argouml
For scheduling: trac (with web-browser) or org-mode (in emacs)
For version control: git or svn

no more necessary. :wink:

I recommend you to choose the best application per one purpose and find a way to integrate them. For me, emacs does the best.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dysoco
n00b
n00b


Joined: 28 May 2011
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2013 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It kind of depends.
If I'm writing Java I'd probably need an IDE: Mostly Eclipse (For Android) and IDEA (For everything else).

For everything else I like Emacs, however, I'm still learning it: and sometimes I mess something or forget some keystrokes, so I always have Sublime Text installed, really nice text editor: not as complex as Emacs, but it works fine.
Why not Gedit/Kate instead of Sublime? Well, I also run Windows, so I like to have the same software in all my OS/PCs.

For editing things like fstab files or .xinitrc I normally use vi or emacs -nw (Emacs in the terminal).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sinisterdomestik
l33t
l33t


Joined: 28 Aug 2003
Posts: 683
Location: Texas

PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2013 2:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dysoco wrote:
For editing things like fstab files or .xinitrc I normally use vi or emacs -nw (Emacs in the terminal).


In this case, as far as working with fstab or .xinitrc or whatnot files, I've always used vim. I never even tried anything else. I've always hated nano. I have seen emacs thrown out a lot, maybe that's something I might need/want to look into.

I'll be the first to say, I am no where NEAR savvy enough with Linux/Gentoo to know all the ins/outs of different editors, programs, etc, but am always trying to learn new "ways".
_________________
Thou shalt NEVER speak of removing thine Linux
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hypnos
Advocate
Advocate


Joined: 18 Jul 2002
Posts: 2868
Location: Omnipresent

PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2013 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sinisterdomestik wrote:
I'll be the first to say, I am no where NEAR savvy enough with Linux/Gentoo to know all the ins/outs of different editors, programs, etc, but am always trying to learn new "ways".

This question has existed since long before Linux was around.

If you want a historical introduction to *nix editors, learn ed and use it for 14 years. Then, try Emacs and see which you like better.
_________________
Personal overlay | Simple backup scheme
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
wcg
Guru
Guru


Joined: 06 Jan 2009
Posts: 588

PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2013 3:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I still install ed. You never know when a "make test" from the dawn
of time in some .tar.gz that you found in an obscure ftp archive
is going to want it. (It is up to 48k on 64-bit x86; sheesh, "bloat!")
_________________
TIA
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic    Gentoo Forums Forum Index Portage & Programming All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Page 2 of 4

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum